War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0227 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

No. 134. Camp Lincoln, Va., June 12, 1862.

I. All fast riding or driving of public horses and mules is positively prohibited, unless in cases of necessity. Trains will not move faster than a walk, except under written orders to the officer or wagon-master in charge. Officers sending mounted messengers with dispatches, which are to be carried at a faster pace than a walk, will indicate upon the envelope the gait the messenger is to take, whether a trot or a gallop. The same directions may be indicated by the seals on the envelope-one seal for the walk, two for the trot, and three for the gallop. Officers will be held responsible for the instructions they give to mounted orderlies or trains with regard to their gait.

All provost-marshal and provost guards are specially charged with the enforcements of this order.

II. The present camp of these headquarters will be known as Camp Lincoln.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

McCLELLAN'S HEADQUARTERS, June 13, 1862.

Major General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE:

General McClellan desires me to say that there is a prospect of an engagement here shortly. He will telegraph you more fully in the course of two or three hours, and at any rate wishes you to remain at Fort Monroe until you hear from him.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Camp Lincoln, June 14, 1862.

Brigadier General R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report for the information of the general commanding that I have caused to be established observatory stations on the other (the left) bank of the Chickahominy, near Hogan's house, and at Austin's house, near the mill this side of Mechanicsville.

From these points the open ground now in possession of the enemy and in front of our lines can be observed. The view extends also over the heights opposite Mechanicsville, and partially covers some of the main roads leading from Richmond and north of the railroad, such as those passing Mr. Christian's, Old Tavern, and Garnett's house, on this side the Chickahominy. These stations communicate directly with a signal station near General Smith's headquarters.

From General Smith's headquarters to this camp I have directed a field telegraph to be extended.

The officers upon the observatory stations are ordered to report any movements of forces of the enemy within their view at 4 a.m., at 12 m., at 6 p.m., and at 12 p.m. In case of firing, to report what guns of the enemy are firing and in what direction. They are further ordered to keep a constant watch with telescopes and report. Messages can be sent hence to these stations or received here whenever it may be desirable.