War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0187 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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This melancholy event leaves a vacancy which I trust will filled immediately by the assignment of an energetic brigadier to that brigade.

This division of Brigadier-General Casey shows a falling off in effective strength since March 30 of 3,577. This computation gives credit for the regiment detached a few days ago and is sufficiently alarming.

I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Fourth Corps.

FORT MONROE, VA., May 22, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Herewith I transmit the copy of a letter forwarded by me this day to Flag-Officer L. M. Goldsborough, as follows:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this date, in which you state that the Secretary of the Navy has ordered you to take all the navy ordnance stores from Fort Monroe and put them at Fort Norfolk. In reply I would remark that Fort Norfolk was surrendered to the troops under my command on the 19th instant by the rebels at Norfolk. I cannot, therefore, permit the Navy to take possession of it without an order from the President of the United States or the Secretary of War.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., May 23, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have the honor to forward the copy of my letter of this date to Flag-Officer L. M. Goldsborough, as follows:

From the information I have received I cannot permit the Navy to take possession of any of the works, including the navy-yard or depot in the vicinity of Norfolk, all having been surrendered to me and taken possession by the troops under my command, without authority of the President of the United States or the Secretary of War.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

P. S. - Please answer.

JOHN. E. WOOL.

FORT MONROE, May 23, 1862.

(Received 8.15 a. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The telegraph wires being down between this and the Headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, it may not be improper to send you the following dispatch from General McClellan:

[From Headquarters Army Potomac, Cold Harbor, 23d.]

To Major General JOHN E. WOOL,

Commanding Department of Virginia, Fort Monroe:

Dispatch received. Much obliged for the information, which corroborates much that