War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0161 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Two of three more of the cavalry regiments I left on the Potomac would be very acceptable. I am overworking what I have.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Camp at Roper's Meeting-House, May 10, 1862.

Brigadier General GEORGE STONEMAN,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: The general commanding desires to be informed without delay what force, if any, the enemy have in the vicinity of New Kent, as far as your knowledge goes, and if there be a force how it is composed-how much artillery, cavalry, and infantry. He would be glad to know if you have learned anything of the enemy's location.

He desires, further, to be acquainted with the condition and character of the roads; what repairs, if any, amy be necessary, and the correct distances, as well as their directions. Any topographical information that you may have acquired with respect to the section within the limits of your reconnaissance it would be desirable to have forwarded.

The commanding general further directs that your dispatch messengers three times within each twenty-four hours to communicate to these headquarters the events that may occur and the information obtained from time to time.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[S. WILLIAMS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Camp at Roder's Meeting-House, May 10, 1862.

Generals SMITH, COUCH, CASEY, KEYES, HEINTZELMAN, HOOKER, and KEARNY:

The commanding general directs that you give the most stringent instructions to prevent depredations upon the persons and property of the inhabitants. No property is to be taken except in extreme cases, and then only by the order of the commander of the troops for the time being and by the officers appointed by him for that purpose.

The weather being now warm, fence rails must not be used for fire-wood, but the necessary fuel must be provided from the woods.

The good conduct of the troops thus far has had the happiest effect, and the general commanding indulges the hope that no effort will be spared on your part to maintain the good name which we have thus gained.

The general deems it of the highest importance that these instructions should be literally obeyed.

The general also directs me to say that he has observed that the trains do not keep properly closed up, but occupy entirely too much space on the road, and he directs that the evil be promptly remedied.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[S. WILLIAMS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

11 R R-VOL XI, PT III