War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0160 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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FORT MONROE, VA., May 10, 1862.

P. H. WATSON, Esq.,

Assistant Secretary, Washington:

The troops were landed last night, and are on the advance to Norfolk. Nothing for the last twenty-four hours from Rodgers' expedition. Nothing of any interest from the army. Your telegram received. We shall wait the result on Norfolk.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT,

Nineteen miles from Williamsburg, May 10, 1862 - 10 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Telegram received. I left instructions to forward to you any news from Rodgers. Glad to hear Norfolk movement. We are getting on well.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA, May 10, 1862 - 12 noon.

Major-General McCLELLAN:

The forces under General Wool are advancing on Norfolk. Great volumes of smoke in the direction of Norfolk indicate that the rebels are burning the city or the navy-yard. Fremont thinks that Johnston [Johnson] with a large force is in front of him. The Merrimac is still at Sewell's Point. Nothing later from Corinth.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

CAMP, NINETEEN MILES FROM WILLIAMSBURG,

May 10, 1862. (Received 5 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have fully established my connection with the troops near West Point, and the dangerous movement has passed. The West Point Railway is not very much injured. Materials for repairs, such as rails, &c., cars, and engines, may now be sent to me. Should Norfolk be taken and the Merrimac destroyed, I can change my line to the James River and dispense with the railroad.

I shall probably occupy New Kent in force to-morrow, and then make my first preparations for battle. As it is, my troops are in advance of their supplies. I must so arrange my depot that we can follow up success. When at New Kent I will be in position to make a thorough examination of the country so as to act understandingly.

General Johnston cannot well be in front of Fremont, for two reasons: First, he has no business there; second, I know that I fought him on Monday, and that he is now on the Chickahominy. I have used his vacated headquarters from day to day. He is certainly in command here with all the troops he can gather.