War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0159 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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sion of the information which induced him to believe that I was guilty of the crime of disobedience of orders.

Very respectfully, your obedience servant.

E. D. KEYES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Fourth Corps.

The following is the copy of the memorandum refereed to, and constituted, with the first order for the march, the only directions in regard to the movements of the troops or wagons which were issued by me:

Memorandum.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH CORPS,

In the Field, May 9, 1862 - 11.20 a. m.

Generals COUCH and CASEY:

You will press on the troops without regard to the wagon trains. Move your men with rapidity, and let the wagon trains come up as fast as the state of the roads will permit.

By order of Brigadier-General Keyes:

C. C. SUYDAM,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

No. 41. Williamsburg, Va., May 8, 1862.

In accordance with orders received from the Headquarters Army of the Potomac, this corps will move to-morrow morning in the following order:

1. Smith's division at 5 a. m.

2. Couch's division at 6.30 a. m.

3. Casey's division at 7.30 a. m.

Each division will carry at least three days' rations, or more if possible, and will drive all their beef cattle. The wagons of each division will follow the command to which they belong. Brigadier-General Smith, commanding Second Division, will send a staff officer to General Headquarters before 8 o'clock to-day, to receive instructions concerning the road to be taken. The other divisions will follow Smith, unless otherwise directed after arriving at Williamsburg. The cavalry will follow immediately after the train of Smith's division.

By order of Brigadier-General Keyes:

C. C. SUYDAM,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., May 10, 1862.

Flag-Officer GOLDSBOROUGH:

MY DEAR SIR: I send you this copy of your report of yesterday for the purpose of saying to you in writing that you are quite right in supposing the movement made by you and therein reported was made in accordance with my wishes verbally expressed to you in advance. I avail myself of the occasion to thank you for your courtesy and all your conduct, so far as known to me, during my brief visit here.

Yours, very truly,

A. LINCOLN.