War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0150 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN,VA. Chapter XXIII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE POTOMAC, McClellan's, May 8, 1862.

M. S. LATHAM and H. M. RICE, Fort Monroe:

On Monday, at 5 p.m., General McClellan arrived on the ground. When he came our left had been turned; Hooker driven back, badly cut up, and a concentration of heavy force was made to cut off Hancock, who had turned the enemy's left at 1 p.m., and who, although he had begged for re-enforcements the entire day, got none. The first order given by General McClellan was to send sufficient force to Hancock, which saved us from sad disaster. General McClellan had ordered a reconnaissance, and never dreamed that Sumner, Heintzelman, and Keyes would bring on a fight. For God's sake make no major-generals without knowing the truth. There was more stupidity expended on that day and more sacrifice of life than many would want to hear of. Our men behaved well.

Yours,

NAGLEE.

CAMP, NINETEEN FROM WILLIAMSBURG, May 8, 1862-3 a.m.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

We have possession of New Kent Court-House, Cumberland, and White House. My troops are closing well up to-day and drawing supplied from Eltham. Reconnaissances are being pushed. One of our parties of cavalry was within 6 miles of Bottom's Bridge yesterday. I am very glad to hear that we have Norfolk. Nothing from Galena, except that she is again afloat and has gone up the river.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, May 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your two telegrams received. I have sent cavalry to Jamestown to endeavor to communicate with Rodgers. General Stoneman is some 14 or 15 miles in advance, and may be able to communicate with Franklin to-night. I shall start Smith's division this afternoon, and I hope three others to-morrow morning. The difficulties arising from the roads are very great, but I will manage to surmount them. If I can effect the junction with Franklin I shall consider our next step gained. It is a delicate matter, but it can be done. I think that the time has arrived to bring all the troops in Eastern Virginia into perfect co-operation. I expect to fight another and very severe battle before reaching Richmond and with all the troops the Confederate can bring together, and therefore should have all the re-enforcements that can be given me.

It is of course possible that the enemy may abandon Richmond without a battle, but we have no right to take that for granted. All the troops on the Rappahannock, and if possible those on the Shenandoah, should take part in the approaching battle. We ought immediately to