War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0127 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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ready for it. I therefore think it proper to take a position somewhat farther outside my present anchorage, till I get a supply of ammunition or till General Franklin be ready to move, but in the mean time shall keep a steamer in position to protect the pontoons I see near Sand Box, and shall also throw a few 11-inch shells into Yorktown or Gloucester, when practicable, at night.

I should think that the pontoons at Sand Box indicate to the enemy the intention to land at Gloucester.

Very respectfully,

J. S. MISSROON,

Commander.

[Inclosure.]

U. S. STEAMER VACHUSETT, York River, April 15, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN,

Commanding Army of the Potomac, near Yorktown, Va.:

MY DEAR GENERAL: On the receipt of your telegram in regard to ranges, elevation, charges, &c., of the 10-pounder rifle on board the Sebago last evening, I required the commander of that vessel to furnish the information desired, but he informed me he had not the information,having just been appointed to that vessel.

I therefore beg to inclose to you the information I happen to possess on the subject, not only of the 100-pounder, but also of the 20 to 30 pounders, as ascertained by late official experiments, and I consider them quite reliable.

The shells you wished thrown into the working parties last evening drove them into the woods, and I have directed the Sebago to occupy a position from which she may operate whenever the enemy my

reappear there.

I am much disappointed at the low ranges obtained last evening of our 11-inch cannon. That class of guns, though destructive when within 1,700 yards, should be made to yield to the 100 and 150 pounder rifle.

Respectfully,yours,

J. S. MISSROON,

Commander.

I am arranging at this moment to use the Sebago for annoying the enemy with her 100-pounder rifle at Gloucester and Yorktown.

OFFICE OF THE SENIOR QUARTERMASTER, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp Winfield Scott, Va., April 28, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: With regard to the operations of our department, as connected with this army, I have the honor to report that I believe that everything is working very satisfactorily.

We have and great difficulties to encounter, but they have been overcome, and the wants of the army have been, and are, supplied promptly. The best evidence of this is that there have been no complaints. Our army is stretched across the Peninsula, the right resting near Yorktown and the left near James River. All our supplies are drawn from the depots at Cheeseman's Creek and Ship Point, except for a small