War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0100 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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men can do to expedite matters. Raining a little this morning, not enough to do any harm yet. I am on point of going on board gunboats with Franklin to reconnoiter.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

NEAR YORKTOWN, April 15, 1862-6 p.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Have found what seems a good landing place for Franklin, who has returned to superintended embarkation of his division.

Naval rifled shells have annoyed enemy considerably to-day. All our work being rapidly pushed, but there is an immense deal to do.

Saw no signs to-day of re-enforcements to the enemy. Weather good again.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

CAMP NEAR YORKTOWN, April 15, 1862-6 p.m.

General J. W. RIPLEY,

Washington:

Can you send us some more 100-pounder rifle and 4 1/2-inch guns? Need them much.

Please do all possible of hurry forward all the train 30-pounder Parrotts, 8-inch siege howitzers, &c., that are still behind. I am anxious to open as soon as possible with overwhelming batteries.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, April 15, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I arrived this morning. Have been on board of the Monitor, and thence to the Minnesota, where I saw Commodore Goldsborough, whose plan for receiving the Merrimac is as perfect as circumstances will admit. He awaits an attack, and will not be drawn from his position into shallow water. Merrimac not seen to-day. Commodore Goldsborough has sent four gunboats to General McClellan's assistance, and has three more in reserve to aid the landing in the Severn. The necessity of occupying Gloucester seems admitted on all hands. Gloucester once taken, Commodore Goldsborough will pass above Yorktown and shell the enemy in flank. This is understood between the two commanders. The enemy has seen the necessity of defending Gloucester and is preparing for it. The country, made almost impassable by the late rains, will soon be in good condition for wagons, except through the known swamps. I hear much better accounts of the condition of the public property than was reported a few days ago on good authority. I am persuaded than the army is in good spirits, and is full of reliance on their commander, who is confident of success; but he needs heavy guns, which are but just now reaching him. I see no opening for any additional order from the War Department.

E. A. HITCHOCK,

Major-General Volunteers.