War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0088 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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tools, &c. Push your division, and join me at once in my camp to arrange movements. I congratulate myself upon your new orders.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, April 11, 1862-11 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The Merrimac came out and planted herself between Newport News and Sewell's Point, with the Yorktown and Jamestown and several gunboats and tugs. The tugs came down as far as Bates' Dock, and carried off three small vessels, empty. Driving cattle across Hampton Bridge this morning it was broken down and I could not cross; otherwise I would have sent my artillery to protect them.

Brigadier-General Casey's division was quite near, within a mile. I believe it is the intention to strengthen the rebels opposite the rebels. I have telegraphed McClellan that the Yorktown and Jamestown were crowded with troops opposite to General Keyes. I have a battery at Newport News, but Brigadier-General Mansfield says for the want of horses it is of no use. Everything we had has been put in requisition to aid the Army of the Potomac; consequently we are somewhat in a crippled condition. The roads are almost impassable.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., April 11, 1862-4 p.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The Merrimac, Jamestown, Yorktown, and several gunboats and tugs appeared between Newport News and Sewell's Point. The only damage done us is the capture of three small vessels, one empty, one loaded with hay, and the other loaded, it is said, with coal. These vessels were captured opposite Brigadier-General Casey's division with small guns of 3-inch caliber, and some 200 feet from shore, and although the shore was lined by soldiers no effort was made to prevent the capture.* Why it was so is more than I can conjecture. The general belongs to the Army of the Potomac, and does not consider himself under my orders, although, since the capture of the vessels, he has offered his and the services of his division if I found need them. His division is detained for want of transportation. He proposes to march on Sunday or Monday to join me Army of the Potomac. We have a fine day, and probably will have a fine moonlight night, when it is conjectured by some that the Merrimac and her companions, the Jamestown and Yorktown, with their gunboats, may attempt to pass out of the Roads. I will detain the Baltimore boat until to-morrow.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Brigadier-General.

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*But see Casey to Wool and Wool to Casey, same date; and Casey to Stanton and Wool to Stanton, April 13, pp. 89,95,96.

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