War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0896 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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Casualties.

Killed...................................... 8

Wounded..................................... 52

Missing..................................... 15

Total....................................... 75

Very respectfully,

R. F. HOKE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

General L. O'B. BRANCH,

Fourth Brigade, Light Division.

No. 346. Report of Lieutenant Colonel William M. Barbour,

Thirty-seventh North Carolina Infantry, of the battles of Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Frazier's Farm [Nelson's Farm, or Glendale], and Malvern Hill.

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH Regiment N. C. TROOPS, July 13, 1862.

GENERAL: The Thirty-seventh Regiment left its camp on June 25, pursuant to orders, with the other regiments composing your brigade, and on the 26th crossed the Chickahominy.

On the evening of the 26th my command reached Mechanicsville, and was exposed to a severe artillery fire, which wounded severely several men and two officers, but the regiment was not otherwise engaged.

On the evening of the 27th we reached Cold Harbor, and my command was ordered into action. Not knowing the position of the enemy, we moved up the road some 200 yards, when the enemy opened a deadly fire upon us, killing several and wounding a large number. The swamp in line of battle, which, together with the destructive fire of the enemy, threw it into considerable confusion, thereby rendering it inefficient for a short time until order could be restored. It behaved during the rest of the engagement very well.

On Monday evening, 30th instant, my regiment, with the other regiments of your command, charged the strongest position occupied by the enemy's artillery and infantry. Throughout this engagement my regiment behaved with great gallantry, driving the enemy before them with great loss.

On Tuesday evening the regiment was again under arms and under fire, but was not engaged.

All the officers of my command behaved well, except those who have been reported to General Hill under previous orders. I take pleasure in mentioning specially Captain Horton, who remained with his company during these trying scenes, although more than sixty years old and worn-out by exposure and fatigue.

In the action of Monday evening Colonel Lee was killed while gallantly leading the regiment into action. He was a brave, experienced officer and a pure man. His loss will be severely felt.

Lieutenant Isham C. Hartzog was mortally wounded on Friday evening, and has since died. He was an excellent officer and a brave, true man.

My total loss is 138 killed and wounded. A number of the wounded