War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0715 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

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At dark withdrew under orders and fell back to the railroad, which we reached at 1 a.m. June 30.

At 6 a.m. moved off to take position on the Darbytown road and reached the battle-field of the same day at 2 o'clock, and July 1 (same day), at 3.30 o'clock, pushed off in line of battle in pursuit of the enemy's fleeing columns.

At 7 a.m. came up with the troops of the heroic Stonewall Jackson who quickly passed our front. We then retired, took another position, and again commenced to advance on the enemy.

At 3 p.m. we came up with the enemy, strongly posted on a high eminence. An attack was immediately ordered by General Magruder, the troops occupying or forming four separate lines of battle, all within range of the enemy's batteries and subject to the most galling and destructive fire of shot and shell. Our brigade, commanded by the gallant Colonel George T. Anderson, was ordered to form the third line of battle, in support of General Cobb's brigade, which formed the second. My regiment was thrown out on the field on the right flank of the Third Brigade and was thrown out on the field on the right flank of the Third Brigade and was supported by the learned and gallant Colonel H. L. Benning, of General Toombs' brigade, which formed the fourth line of battle.

We remained under the several and well-directed fire of the enemy from 5 to 9 p.m.

Our casualties here were considerable: Adjt. John Green, wounded severely in the shoulder; Lieutenant M. F. Gudger, Company D, wounded in the hand; Lieutenant Nathaniel Parish, Company E, wounded in the side; 6 men killed on the field and 50 wounded, most of whom very severely;

Killed..................................................... 6

Wounded................................................... 57

Missing................................................... 16

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Total..................................................... 79

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. LUFFMAN,

Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, Eleventh Regiment Georgia Volunteers.

Colonel GEORGE T. ANDERSON,

Commanding Third Brigade, First Division, Army of the Potomac.

Numbers 285. Report of Major General Lafayette McLaws,

C. S. Army, commanding division, of engagement at Peach Orchard, or Allen's Farm, and battles of Savage Station and Malvern Hill.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, July 20, 1862.

The following is a report of the operations of my command, composed of the brigades of Generals Kershaw and Semmes, commencing on the 26th ultimo and ending July 1:

On the 26th I received orders to hold my command in readiness for any movement. None was, however, made.

On the 27th the troops were under arms at daylight. The lookouts, posted in trees overlooking the enemy's camps near the railroad, reported that the works of the enemy were being strengthened, more guns being placed in the redoubts near the railroad and all the works numerously manned.