War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0599 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

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[Inclosure.]

List of killed and wounded in the Fourth Brigade, Valley District, commanded by General A. R. Lawton, in the action of July 1.

Command Killed Wounded

13th Regiment Georgia - 1

Volunteers: Officers

Non-commissioned 9 45

officers and privates

Total 9 46

60th Regiment Georgia - -

Volunteers: Officers

Non-commissioned - 14

officers and privates

Total - 14

38th Regiment Georgia - -

Volunteers: Officers

Non-commissioned - 6

officers and privates

Total - 6

Grand total 9 66

Aggregate - 75

No. 247. Reports of Colonel Marcellus Douglass,

Thirteenth Georgia Infantry, of the battles of Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill.

CAMP NEAR MAGRUDER'S MILL, VA., July 28, 1862.

CAPTAIN: In the battle of the 27th ultimo my regiment [the Thirteenth Georgia] took part as follows, viz:

About 5 p.m. the brigade was marched forward to within a quarter of a mile of where we heard the nearest heavy musketry. General Lawton, who was at the head of the column, ordered me to put my regiment in action, which I did as soon as possible, forming a line of battle near a house and marching across a field to a body of woods, before reaching which we had to cross a belt of dead pines which the enemy had felled to impede the progress of troops. The men kept steadily forward in good order to the woods, when I was met by a young man from a Louisiana regiment, who asked the privilege of guiding us to where he said the enemy were waiting in concealment and by whom, he stated, his regiments had been badly used and scattered. Directly in front of my line there was no firing from small-arms, but a battery throwing shell was constantly playing, everything being entirely hid from view by the woods into which we entered. Marching was an exceedingly difficult operation on account of the fallen timber. Arriving at the foot of the hill and near a branch, we were within 30 or 40 yards of the enemy's lines, and they poured a terrific volley of musketry upon us. I ordered the men to lie down, and communicated to Lieutenant Colonel James M. Smith, Major John H. Baker, and Adjt. J. D. Hill my intention to order a bayonet charge, and as soon as the enemy's fire at all slackened I directed the color-bearer to proceed across the branch and up the hill, and immediately gave the command to charge. From some cause, I know not certainly what, my