War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0511 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

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I understand that the pieces turned in by Captain Andrews were exchanged on the field for captured pieces, and that many similar exchanges and appropriations were made without authority.

I inclose the report of Lieutenant Jones as to the numbers of small arms and accouterments brought in up to the present. Most of them are the arms of our men, some belonging to our killed and wounded; the balance having been exchanged on the field for the superior arms of the enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SMITH STANSBURY,

Captain, Commanding.

Major E. P. ALEXANDER.

We received caissons and part of caissons more or less damaged.

[Inclosure.]

ORDNANCE STORE, RICHMOND ARSENAL, July 15, 1862.

SIR: The number of small-arms received at the artillery workshop up to date amounts to 27,972, with about 3,000 still in the hands of the Quartermaster's Department, making a total of nearly 31,000.

In regard to accouterments I can make only an approximate estimate, as it is impossible to get at the actual number of each article until they have been separated and assorted. Eight men are now engaged in doing this. I think 10,000 sets of accouterments and 6,000 knapsacks is about the quantity up to this time.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK F. JONES,

First Lieutenant Artillery, on Ordnance Duty.

Captain S. STANSBURY,

Commanding Arsenal.

No. 204. Report of Captain James E. Weeb,

C. S. Army, Acting Ordnance Officer of General D. H. Hill's division, of captured ordnance.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Near Richmond, July 15, 1862.

SIR: I beg to make the following report:

Captain Hardaway's battery, attached to General Anderson's brigade, appropriated two 3-inch rifled wrought [?] iron guns, which had been taken from the enemy, to supply the places of two of its own burst, one at Mechanicsville, the other at Cold Harbor. He also took a limber with these pieces and left his own on the field.

Captain Carter, commanding the King William Artillery, of General Rodes' brigade, exchanged, and gave his own to an ordnance train.

In the Hanover Artillery, commanded by Captain Nelson and attached to General Colquitt's brigade, no exchange was made. There was no change mad in the Jeff. Davis' Artillery, of General Garland's brigade.