War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0430 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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June by five reserve batteries, under Lieutenant-Colonel Getty, five 30-pounder Parrott guns, and five 4 1/2-inch siege guns.

The forces of the enemy appeared in motion early in the morning, but no attack was made until about 10.30 a. m., when his artillery opened upon curs from the crest of the hill near Garnett's house. The cannonading was exceedingly severe for about an hour, when the enemy ceased firing. Very little harm was done by the fire. Demonstrations were made by the enemy during the day, and our artillery fired at forces of infantry on the east side of the river, which were moving against General F. J. Porter. This fire was very effective, and forced the enemy to move toward our right instead of keeping along the valley of the river.

About 6.30 p. m. the enemy again opened a very heavy artillery fire, shelling the camps and artillery, but as in the morning, doing very little damage. This fire lasted nearly an hour.

About sundown a severe infantry attack was made upon General Hancock, who with his brigade held the picket line. The fight lasted about forty-five minutes, when the enemy retired, not having been able to gain an inch of ground. Lieutenant-Colonel Buck, Second New Jersey Regiment, who commanded the pickets of Slocum's division, fought them with great gallantry, driving the enemy from in front of his position.

On the morning of the 28th of June, finding the enemy in great force at Garnett's, a new battery in the valley of the river and a battery of heavy guns at Gaines' Hill, I withdrew all the force to the edge of the wood inclosing Golding's farm, Slocum's division on the right of the road and Smith's on the left connecting with General Sumner's line. We were severely shelled from all of their batteries just before the movement commenced and while it was going on. Just after the movement was completed two Georgia regiments made an attack upon the pickets. They were handsomely repulsed with great loss with the help of Captain Mott's battery. A colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and about 20 privates were taken by our troops.

On the morning of the 29th June I was ordered by the commanding general to move my command as follows, viz: Slocum's division to Savage Station, in reserve; Smith's division to a point near the Chickahominy between the river and Savage Station, joining on the right with McCall's division and on the left with Sumner's corps. General Slocum arrived at Savage Station at an early hour, and was directed by the commanding general to cross the White Oak Swamp. General Smith's division arrived at its position about 7 o'clock in the morning. I immediately sent out cavalry to communicate with General Sumner and General McCall, but could hear nothing of either of them. A staff officer of General Sumner informed me, however, that he was some distance in front of the position in which I understood that he was to have been, and that his right was quite a mile from my left. After holding the position for two hours of more, finding that the enemy was warmly engaged with General Sumner informed me, however, that he was some distance in front of the position in which I understood that he was to have been, and that his right was quite a mile from my left. After holding the position for two hours or more, finding that the enemy was warmly engaged with General Sumner, was crossing in force by a bridge nearly in my front, and that I was unprotected on both flanks, I directed General Smith to fall back upon Savage Station. There I sent word to General Sumner, advising him to fall back to the same point. He immediately marched there with his full force. I understood that General Heintzelman was with his force to occupy the same point, but he proceeded directly across White Oak Swamp.

About 4 o'clock the signal officers reported the enemy advancing on the railroad with infantry and artillery. While General Sumner was