War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0300 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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large number of sick and detailed men left by us in camp began to make their appearance, having found their way across the Chickahominy with the trains, some of them having been able to perform some service on the way. About 20 of the number are still missing, some of whom it is supposed were captured by the enemy. I have caused requisitions to be made for shelter-tents and camp equipage for the men, all their clothing and knapsacks, including their shelter-tents, having been left in camp, and subsequently destroyed before the camp was abandoned to the enemy. In every other respect I am happy to be able to report the regiment as in good order.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES BARNES,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain CHARLES J. POWERS,

Asst. Adjt. General, First Brigadier, Morell's Div., Porter's Fifth A. C.

Numbers 122. Report of Major William S. Tilton,

Twenty-second Massachusetts Infantry, of the battles of Mechanicsville and Gaines' Mill.

BOSTON, July 25, 1862.

GENERAL: In accordance with your request I have the honor to make a brief report of the part taken by the Twenty-second Massachusetts in the battles of the 26th and 27th ultimo. That I may be properly understood, I shall have to mention the position of other troops, which I trust will not be out of order.

On Thursday, the 26th, I left camp in command of the regiment, and by order of General Martindale made a stand on Hanover Court-House road, about 1 mile east of Mechanicsville. The First Michigan, covered by the Twenty-fifth New York, were posted in a belt of timber on the right of the road; the Thirteenth New York and the Twenty-second Massachusetts to the left. A section of Martin's battery was drawn up to the right of our regiment and covered the road. I proceeded to fell trees, to make openings for artillery and an abatis, to strengthen our position. Colonel Gove now came upon the ground and assumed command of the Twelve-second and Thirteenth.

Rapid musketry firing was now heard to the left. General Martindale ordered Colonel Gove to deploy a company of skirmishers to the ascertain what it was. Pending this operation word came that the enemy were in force at Old Church. The brigade should guard against being outflanked. Before the skirmishers had time to deploy we were ordered to move through the woods to our left and rear, and support a battery in Griffin's command engaged with the enemy at Mechanicsville. On emerging from the woods, about 800 yards in the rear of the battery, we met a warm reception, but got under having retreated across the Chickahominy, at dark I withdrew a short distance and picketed for the night.

Friday, June 27, turned out at 2 o'clock a.m., and after much delay marched back to camp on Curtis' Farm. During our march quite an action was going on on the bank of the Chickahominy toward our right. We stopped in camp an hour, packed up for a retreat, destroyed commissary stories; also the pontoon train. The four right companies