War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0231 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

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from us in this battle I have to mourn the loss of the brave, gallant, and beloved Colonel Woodbury, Fourth Michigan Volunteers, and Colonel Cass, Ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, who had escaped the dangers of Mechanicsville and Gaines' Mill, and who were about to see their noble efforts and those of their comrades crowned with success and themselves with honor.

In presenting this my hasty and preliminary report of the services of this corps and of those commands which accidentally or by order served with it, I cannot close it without a tribute in general terms to the gallant officers and men who have day after day contended successfully against immense odds in severe battles, made long marches, endured exposure, fatigue, and hunger without a murmur, and patiently awaited attack of the immense forces of the enemy pouring upon us with a confidence of success. Cheered by the example of their officers; held together by mutual confidence, arising from strict discipline; relying under Providence in the justice of their cause, this gallant band has on three occasions withstood the brunt of attack of the main force of the enemy, and finally driven him from the field when expecting success to crown his efforts-that success the capture of destruction of this army. I am gratified to be able to add that in this movement of the army to its new base, hard pressed as it has been at times, the corps has maintained its discipline and unity, and with its accustomed cheerfulness and confidence has ever been and is now ready for any duty required of it.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. J. PORTER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH PROVISIONAL ARMY CORPS, July 8, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to forward to you for the Government at Washington four rebel flags taken in battle by different commands of this corps. Two were captured by the Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Reserve Corps at the battle on the New Market Road, June 30, 1862; another at the same time and place by the Ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Reserve Corps, and the fourth by the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Butterfield's brigade, Morell's division, at the battle of Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862.

I desire to state that another flag was taken by a regiment of Couch's division at the battle of Malvern Hill from a rebel regiment which had been already cut to pieces by the destructive fire of Kingsbury's battery. This flag is properly a trophy of this battery, although it is held and claimed by the above-named regiment of Couch's division.

An account of the capture of these flags in attached to each, with the names of the regiments to which they belonged, as well as the names of the captors.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. J. PORTER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.