War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0206 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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serted and lanyard in hand, awaited the coming of the enemy, delivering the first fire in the nick of time. To the subsequent quick loading and firing by the cannoneers may be attributed the great amount of destruction. The whole affair was over in less than five minutes. One section of rifled artillery could not have done better.

Very respectfully,

ROBT. M. WEST,

Major, Commanding.

Numbers 85. Report of Lieutenant Martin Reichenbacher,

Battery C, First Pennsylvania Light Artillery, of the destruction of Turkey Bridge.

LIGHT ARTILLERY, FOURTH CORPS, July 11, 1862.

SIR: I respectfully submit the report of the destruction of Turkey Bridge on the 2nd day of July, 1862:

Being ordered by the general commanding the Fourth Corps to take means and proceed to Turkey Bridge and destroy it after the rear guard of the army had passed, in pursuance to the above order 25 men from the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry were supplied with axes and some 75 pounds of powder. We proceeded to the above-named place, and after the rear guard had passed the bridge was destroyed by cutting the stringers in the center of the bridge and cutting the planks in small pieces and felling trees over the bridge, and also at some places along the road, making it completely impassable for the passage of troops of any army. There also accompanied me Lieutenant Gibson, of General McClellan's staff, and Lieutenant Jackson, of General Keyes' staff. I conferred with those officers as to the best mode of obstructing. After the bridge being destroyed I returned to my command.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN REICHENBACHER,

First Lieutenant, Battery C, First Pennsylvania Artillery.

Captain C. C. SUYDAM,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourth Corps.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS OF ARTILLERY, FOURTH CORPS, July 12, 1862.

This officer was selected for the important duty referred to within on account of his known coolness, bravery, and quickness of perception. The result of the affair confirms his claims to these qualities. Lieutenant Reichenbacher is entitled to his full share of whatever credit may be due for the successful destruction of the bridge and obstruction of the road. In any position where a brave and faithful officer and a thorough soldier will be appreciated he will always give entire satisfaction.

Respectfully,

ROB'T M. WEST,

Major, Pennsylvania Artillery, Commanding.