War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0187 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

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enemy in confusion. The Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, Colonel Hayman, charged a rebel regiment and broke it into confusion. The Fifth Michigan again fought as usual. Major Fairbanks, its only field officer, was here badly wounded. The Third Michigan was with the Second Brigade and the Second Michigan was with the First Brigade. They behaved as Michigan soldiers always do-well. None flinched. At the battle of Malvern Hill my brigade was exposed to the shot and shell from morning till night. Notwithstanding many were killed and wounded, the regiments maintained the most perfect order.

I have to make honorable mention of Captain Wilson, my acting assistant adjutant-general; also Lieutenants Freeman and Greenhalgh. They were active in carrying out my wishes during the battles mentioned. Lieutenant Greenhalgh led the Twenty-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers, of General Burns' command, gallantly into the fight, repulsing the enemy and capturing a stand of rebel colors at one of the most critical periods of the fight. All my company officers behaved well. I have no fault to find with any. For the particulars ones who distinguished themselves more than others I respectfully refer you to the regimental reports.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. G. BERRY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Brigade.

Captain W. G. STURGES.

No. 73. Report of Major Louis Dillman,

Second Michigan Infantry, of the engagement at Oak Grove, or King's School-House.

CAMP OF SECOND REGIMENT MICHIGAN INFANTRY, June 27, 1862.

CAPTAIN: In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters, received in the morning of June 25, I left camp at 7 a.m. on Sunday to relieve the Thirty-seventh New York, then on picket in the woods to the left of General Hooker's line of pickets. Soon after leaving camp I was joined by two companies of the First New York, that were to act as a reserve to the Second Michigan Regiment. By order of Brigadier-General Hooker's line of pickets. Soon after leaving camp I was joined by two companies of the First New York, that were to act as a reserve to the Second Michigan Regiment. By order of Brigadier-General Berry I deployed three companies of my regiment as skirmishers on the old picket line, with instructions to advance the right of the line just fast enough to keep up a connection with the skirmishers of the Third Maine, who were deployed to the right of my line. The two regiments becoming separated, a company of the Third Michigan was thrown onto the line, to form a connection on the right with the Third Maine and on the left with the Second Michigan. The line was now formed, but was left very crooked. On the 26th I straightened the line, and as now placed the pickets are about half a mile in advance of the line as we found it on the morning of the 25th. I would further report that there has been no unusual movement or noise observed on our front while on this tour of picket duty. I was relieved this morning by Colonel Hayman, Thirty-seventh New York.

Your obedient servant,

LOUIS DILLMAN,

Major, Commanding Second Regiment Michigan Volunteers.

[Captain G. W. WILSON,

Asst. Adjt. General, Third Brigade, Third Div., Third Corps.]