War of the Rebellion: Serial 013 Page 0165 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

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to mere skeletons of regiments, there is but one observation to be made-that previous military, history presents no such parallel.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. KEARNY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Division.

Captain CHAUNCEY McKEEVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Corps.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, THIRD CORPS, July 6, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to report in continuation that at the close of the battle on the New Market road our men remained in position until midnight, when orders were brought from General Heintzelman to effect a retreat, as General Franklin had already abandoned his position. This move was again effected quietly and rapidly by the troops, but at some sacrifices from the want of transportation. By dawn we were in a new and stronger position.

It was toward noon when the battle was again renewed-the battle of Malvern Hill. In this battle, whilst all our regiments were on the alert and under artillery fire and all lost more or less from the enemy's shelling and grape shot, none but our artillery and skirmishers were immediately engaged. Captain Thompson managed his battery with the full genius of that arm, whilst Captain Randolph with his Parrott guns persecuted all that attacked him, silencing several times batteries that were sweeping our front or covering their columns of attack on General Couch to our left. The Fourth Maine particularly distinguished itself for its coolness in holding the ravine in our front and daringly engaging the skirmishers of the enemy's attacking columns. Their loss was considerable.

The brigades of Generals Robinson and Berry were principally in reserve, but were constantly sent forward in support, as the tide of battle swerved to and from on our left. The first line was held by General Birney with coolness and firmness, and the regiments, even under fire, erected for themselves well-arranged rifle pits. Had the next day witnessed a renewal of the battle, success was sure.

Our loss was 951 in the several engagements. It was midnight that we were again called on to move in retreat, and tired as were all our command it was again executed with much regularity, and we arrived at 10 a.m. at Harrison's Landing.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. KEARNY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Captain CHAUNCEY McKEEVER,

Asst. Adjt. General, Third Corps.

No. 62. Report of Captain George E. Randolph,

Battery E, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, of the action at Brackett's, and the battles of Glendale and Malvern Hill.

CAMP NEAR HARRISON'S LANDING, July 18, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor respectfully to report the movements of my battery in the recent actions from June 29 to July 2.