War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0936 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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you have any reason to believe an answer will be made by General Longstreet. You must perceive that by postponing an answer your published report is allowed to go down to history as true. I cannot conceive that your desire to perpetrate such an injustice, for though it may ruin me, it cannot redound to sour credit. If you will investigate the case I am sure you will discover the errors of your report and correct them; but if I am thus to suffer by sixty and ninety days' delay, I must claim a court at once. I send you herewith an abstract of such parts of your report as refer to my division, with my remarks annexed, to which I invite your attention.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. HUGER,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., October 2, 1862.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSON, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose for your attention copies of a letter addressed to the President by General Huger and of the indorsement made thereon by the President.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

RICHMOND, VA., September 22, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I inclose a communication for the President, which I request you to lay before him. I am aware at this moment he has little opportunity to attend to any individual, but trust he will at his earliest leisure give it his consideration.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. HUGER,

Major-General.

[Sub-inclosures.]

RICHMOND, VA., September 21, 1862.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES:

SIR: I send you herewith an extract of such portions of General J. E. Johnson's published report of the battle of Seven Pines as refers to my division, with my remarks appended. As General Johnson does not seem disposed to investigate the subject, and shields himself by endeavoring to make General Longstreet responsible for his statements, I have to request that you direct General Johnson to prefer charges against me for the negligence he attributes to me, and we then be examined by a court-martial. If this cannot be done, I ask a court of inquiry to examine into the facts. I am entitled to this protection to my reputation and this justice to the troops I command.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. HUGER,

Major-General.

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*See p.937.

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