War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0626 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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I received orders from brigade headquarters between 6 and 7 o'clock on the morning of the 7th to deploy the regiment under my command as skirmishers through the woods against which the enemy was supposed to be. Accordingly I deployed seven companies-A, B, C, D, E, F, and K-to right and left of road leading directly through the wood, holding the three remaining companies near the edge and center of the woods as a reserve; Lieutenant-Colonel town commanding the right wing, Major Hubbs the left, and myself the center, we moved cautiously and when near the outer edge of woods discovered a detachment of the enemy's cavalry, the denseness of the foliage, however, rendering it impossible to ascertain their exact number. Our skirmishers immediately opened fire upon them, driving them out of the woods and over a slight rise of ground. Continued our advance, and before reaching the top of the rise were met by a full regiment of infantry, supporting the cavalry of the enemy, which had been lying in ambush, apparently awaiting our advance. Ordered were immediately given for the skirmishers to fall back, which they did in order, keeping their places and at the same time continuing a brick fire upon the enemy. As we fell back upon the main road (still firing) we came upon a barricade of felled trees, supposed to have been thrown across by our pickets of the previous day and night. Thinking it more than probable the enemy might endeavor to advance upon us with cavalry and artillery in force, I immediately took means to retain possession of the barricade and thus prevent any attack in that quarter, which position we continued to hold until relieved by the Thirty-first and Thirty-second New York Volunteers. I then formed the regiment in line, flanking our artillery on the left, in which position we remained until the close of the engagement.

During the whole day the regiment conducted itself in a manner highly creditable and more particularly so when we consider the difficulty of the situation and the fact that most of the men were on this occasion under fire for the first time.*

Killed (privates)........................................... 1

Wounded (privates).......................................... 7

Missing (privates).......................................... 7

Total.......................................................15

I have the honor to be, yours, respectfully,

J. M. GOSLINE,

Colonel Ninety-fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Captain JAMES E. MONTGOMERY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade.

Numbers 10. Report of Major General Gustavus W. Smith,

C. S. Army, commanding Reserve.

HEADQUARTERS RESERVE,

Cross-Roads, Va., May 12, 1862.

MAJOR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a report just received from Brigadier General W. H. C. Whiting, commanding a division of this

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*Nominal list omitted, but see revised statement, p. 618.

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