War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0379 Chapter XXIII. SIEGE OF YORKTOWN, VA.

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whom were wounded. Sergeant Holton, of Company I,rescued the colors, which had fallen in the water-the color-bearer having been shot down. Captain Davenport, of Company H, was seriously wounded in the thigh while bravely leading his men to he attack. Corporal Cox, of Company A, was taken prisoners, but by his adroitness succeeded in effecting his escape. Corporal Duggan and Sergeant Danshee, of Company A, and Sergt. Porter Crane, of Company H, merit all praise for their bravery. With such officers and men the enemy's fortifications can be taken. The colors of the regiment were pierced by eleven bullets.

Accompanying this you will find a statement of killed, wounded, and missing.*

Very respectfully,

N. LORD, JR.,

Colonel Sixth Regiment Vermont Volunteers.

Captain THEODORE READ,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 40. Reports of Brigadier General Charles S. Hamilton,

U. S. Army commanding division, of engagement near Lee's Mill, or Burnt Chimneys.

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS, April 16, 1862.

CAPTAIN: The cannonade of this morning has resulted in giving us the exact range of the enemy's works on our left. The rebels were driven from their work and compelled to take shelter behind their intrenchments. The fire from our side developed ten guns in position in the rebel earthworks, two of which are 24-pounders.

One private killed in a Michigan regiment by a cannot-shot. No other casualties.

I think we can now effectually stop further strengthening of the rebel works on my left, and we have the range so perfectly that their works can only be occupied by taking close shelter under the parapet.

Very respectfully.

C. S. HAMILTON.

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain CHAUNCEY McKEEVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS, April 16, 1862

GENERAL: I have to report that the batteries of my division opened a brisk fire on the enemy's works in front of my left at 11 a.m. to-day. The fire resulted, first, in driving the enemy from his rifle pits into his works; second, in driving everything from their barracks and camp; and third, in driving all the infantry from the works into the woods in the rear, leaving only a few men in the works to man the guns; one of the enemy's guns entirely disabled.

Have further to report that the line of rebel works for three-quarters of a mile could have been carried by single brigade with very little

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*See p. 367.

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