War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0291 Chapter XXIII. SIEGE OF YORKTOWN, VA.

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of their positions, while Colonel Roberts, commanding the Second Maine, deployed and supported those batteries on the extreme left. These regiments both bivouacked that night in the positions assigned to them, and were not withdrawn from there until the following day. It is an unkind and unfair presentation of the gallantry, coolness, and daring of these regiments and their commanders, and especially of Colonel Gove and the Twenty-second Massachusetts, as reclining on their arms, when the report of the medical director shows 9 wounded men in the Twenty-second Massachusetts alone (one of whom has since died)-more than all the other casualties in your three brigades that day put together.

I know that the commanding general of this division will appreciate the feelings with the gentleman commanding my regiments and other officers and men are likely to regard this first semi-official account of their first trial under fire. For myself I would be the last to detract from the heroism of the other brigades of this division and their able commanders, but it is not conceivable that either of them would approve of the narrative to which attention is now called.

Opportunity was afforded on that day to test the qualities of all my regiments, and in a very high degree of the Twenty-second Massachusetts. The last-named regiment was under severe fire, and but for the cool, discreet, and fearless conduct of its commander would have suffered still more from their exposure.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOHN H. MARTINDALE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain FRED. T. LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, PORTER'S DIVISION,

Near Yorktown, Va., April 7, 1862.

I have to report for the information of the commanding general that Lieutenant-Colonel Ingraham, brigade field officer of the day, has just returned from the reconnaissance made by him in company with Lieutenant McAlester. Lieutenant-Colonel Ingraham reports that there is considerable activity along the line of the road leading toward Yorktown from the forts and batteries on my left, from which the firing was opened on us day before yesterday. It is his conjecture that a battery is being constructed a little back of the fort, which is vacant, a little to our left. There are also sounds of activity at the point indicated by me to the commanding general yesterday, where Captain McMahon, of the Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers, supposed two guns were being placed. Last night a considerable body of men approached to within a few paces of the pickets of the Twenty-fifth, but drew up in line of battle after the men went down and opened fire by file on the position occupied by the pickets of the Twenty-second Massachusetts in the peach orchard. Lieutenant-Colonel Ingraham reports that in his opinion the two positions where he thinks batteries are being placed will command our camps within easy range, and that the enemy has ascertained the fact by the view of pickets from the tops of trees. He saw one instance of observation of that character.

Respectfully, &c.,

JOHN H. MARTINDALE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain FRED. T. LOCKE,

A. A. G.