War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0224 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

Jersey Volunteers, and Second Lieutenant G. H. McNary, Tenth Pennsylvania Reserves, and Second Lieutenant W. G. McCreary, One hundred and second Pennsylvania Volunteers, near General Porter. First Lieutenant H. R. Clum, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, on board United States steamship Galena. Second Lieutenant Isaac Beckett, Fifty-sixth New York Volunteers, on board United States steamship Mahaska. Second Lieutenant E. A. Denicke, Cameron Rifles, New York Volunteers, and Second Liet. A. B. Jerome, First New Jersey Volunteers, on board the United States steamship Aroostook. First Lieutenant C. S. Kendall, First Massachusetts Volunteers, on Haxall's house; and First Lieutenant B. F. Fisher, Third Pennsylvania Reserves.

In the movements of the night of July 1 and on July 2 from Malvern Hill to the position now occupied by this army; in obtaining and conveying throughout the night of July 1 information to the general commanding the army, then on board the United States steamship Galena, as to those movements of the forces he had remained to superintend; in directing by his order on July 2 the position of the gunboat covering the rear of the wagon train, and which repelled the attack of the enemy on that train; in establishing communication between general headquarters on its arrival at this place and the fleer; in the observation and the announcement of the approach of the enemy to shell this camp on July 3; in designating to the gunboats where they could have the opportunity to be of service to the army on that day, and in reconnoitering and reporting upon the retreat of the enemy, valuable services were rendered.

For these services are mentioned: First Lieutenant H. R. Clum, Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, on board united States steamship Galena; First Lieutenant C. S. Kendall, First Massachusetts Volunteers; Second Lieutenant J. T Gloskosky, Twenty-ninth New York Volunteers; Second Liet. J. C. Wiggins, Third New Jersey Volunteers, and Second Lieutenant F. W. Marston, Fortieth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

On June 3, just after the battle of Fair Oaks, while this army lay north of the Chickahominy, the pickets of the left wing, which was then south of the Chickahominy, and the position of which was not before known to be at any point visible from the right wing, were discovered at a distance of 3 miles across the swamp by the signal officer on duty at Hogan's house. Communication was had over the swamp and the fact established that part of our left wing was visible. The swamp was then impassable between the points, and the enemy held the ground between them. This communication was kept up for many days by officers exposed to and often under the artillery fire of the enemy. The records will show the importance of the messages transmitted and the bearing they had upon the movements of this army. The communication was between the general commanding the army, Generals W. B. Franklin, F. J. Porter, and W. F. Smith.

The officers most exposed on these stations have been once mentioned. Others who served faithfully will be mentioned hereafter.

I have the honor further to state, as in place in this report of recent operations with this army, the following will be claimed in a more detailed report as in reference to the volume of the services rendered by these officers and men of the Signal Corps of the Army:

1st. That without the co-operation of the Army and Navy the evacuation at this base of operations at White House Point, Va., could or would not have been conducted with the system and success which marked it, and that co-operation could not have been obtained in any