War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0163 Chapter XXIII. GENERAL REPORTS.

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and Chickahominy which were burned by the rebels. These will be finished by to-morrow evening, when supplies can be brought on the road to within 7 miles of our extreme right wing. Our left will have has been burned. The bridge across the Pamunkey and one short bridge near West Point will be rebuilt as soon as the road in front is put in running order. When that is done West Point can be made a depot also. It possesses many advantages. There is a good wharf, and 20 feet of water can be carried there, up one of the finest rivers, I have ever seen. Two or three days would have been gained in putting the road in order had the proper vessels been forwarded from Baltimore. By some mistake the vessels which should have sailed first sailed last.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STEWART VAN VLIET,

Brigadier-General and Quartermaster.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

[Inclosure C.]

CAMP NEAR CHICKAHOMINY, June 5, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 21st ultimo in regard to taking horses from the teams for artillery purposes. This is impracticable at the present time, as our transportation is insufficient, owing to the very bad condition of the roads. I have never seen worse roads in any part of the country. Teams cannot haul over half a load, and often empty wagons are stalled. Our loss of animals is very great. The railroad is of great assistance, but it does not allow us to dispense with our wagons, as with the exception of very few the troops are not on it. The heavy rains of yesterday have injured the railroad very materially, having washed it away in several places. Heavy working parties are on it, and I hope to have it in running order again to-day. The difficulties under which our department has to labor, owing to the frequent and heavy rains and the nature of the country in which we are operating, are very great.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STEWART VAN VLIET,

Brigadier-General and Quartermaster.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

[Inclosure D.]

CAMP NEAR CHICKAHOMINY, June 9, 1862.

GENERAL: In view of the re-enforcements ordered to this army [twenty-three regiments], seven of which have already arrived, I have the honor to state that I this day telegraphed you for one hundred and fifty wagons and teams complete. This should be in addition to the transportation with McCall's division, which it is supposed he will bring with him. It now requires every means of transportation we possess, both rail and wagon, to keep the army supplied with forage and subsistence. Had we had such weather as we had reason to expect