War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0092 THE PENINSULA CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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House, and on the Chickamahominy, as well as in regard to the Seven Days and the recent retreat. No one has ever said anything to cheer them but myself. Say nothing about me. Merely give my men and officers credit for what they have done. It will do you much good, and will strengthen you much with them if you issue a handsome order to them in regard to what they have accomplished. They deserve it.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK, Washington, D. C.

As no reply was received to this communication, and no order was issued by the General-in-Chief, I conclude that suggestion did not meet with his approbation.

All the personnel and material of the army had been transferred from Harrison's Landing to the different points of embarkation in the very brief period of five days without the slightest loss or damage. Porter's troops sailed from Newport News on the 19th and 20th. Heintzelman's corps sailed from Yorktown on the 21st. On that day I received the following telegram from the General-in-Chief:

WASHINGTON, August 21, 1862-6 p.m.

Leave such garrisons in Fort Monroe, Yorktown, &c., as you may deem proper. They will be replaced by new troops as rapidly as possible.

The forces of Burnside and Pope are hard pushed, and require aid as rapidly as you can send it. Come yourself as soon as you can.

By all means see that the troops sent have plenty of ammunition. We have no time here to supply them. Moreover, they may have to fight as soon as they land.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

General McCLELLAN.

To which the following are replies:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Fort Monroe, August 21, 1862-7.30 p.m.

Your dispatch of 6 p.m. received. I have not an hour in sending troops, not will I. Franklin is here, and I will try to get some of his troops on board to-night. I had already ordered all the ammunition forward.

I will put headquarters on board ship early to-morrow morning, so that I can leave at a moment's notice. I hope that I can get off to-morrow. Shall I go in person to Aquia, or do you wish to see me first at Washington? If you wish it, I can probably ship quite an amount of ammunition for other troops than this army.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Fort Monroe, August 21, 1862-10.25 p.m.

I have ample supplies of ammunition for infantry and artillery, and will have it up in time. I can supply any deficiency that may exist in General Pope's army. Quite a number of rifled field guns are on hand here.

The forage is the only question for you to attend to. Please have that ready for me at Aquia. I want many more schooners for cavalry horses. They should have water on hand when they come here.

If you have leisure, and there is no objection, please communicate to me fully the state of affairs and your plans. I will then be enabled to arrange details understandingly.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK, Washington.

Immediately on reaching Fort Monroe I gave directions for strengthening the defenses of Yorktown to resist any attack from the direction of Richmond, and left General Keyes, with his corps, to perform the work and temporarily garrison the place.