War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0090 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN., VA. Chapter XXIII.

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a force in our front as to require all the troops I have remaining to insure the safety of the land movement with its immense train, I shall send every man by water that transports will carry.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Commanding U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Berkeley, August 15, 1862-1.30 p.m.

The advance corps and trains are fairly started. I learn nothing more in relation to reported advance of rebels via Jones' Bridge. Shall push the movement as rapidly as possible.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Berkeley, August 15, 1862-10 p.m.

Coggins' Point is abandoned. The whole of McCall's division, with its artillery, is now en route Burnside. We have not yet transportation sufficient for our sick. I hope we will get it to-morrow.

Porter is across the Chickamauga, near its mouth, with his wagons and reserve artillery. Heintzelman at Jones' Bridge with a portion of his corps. They will all be up by morning. Averell's cavalry on the other side. All quiet thus far. I cannot guet the last of the wagons as far as Charles City Court-House before some time to-morrow afternoon.

I am hurrying matters with the utmost rapidity possible. Wagons will move all night.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington, D. C.

After the commencement of the movement it was continued with the utmost rapidity until all the troops and material were en route both by land and water on the morning of the 16th. Late in the afternoon, of that day, when the last man had disappeared from the deserted camps, I followed with my personal staff in the track of the Grand Army of the Potomac, bidding farewell to the scenes still covered with the marks of its presence, and to be forever memorable in history as the vicinity of its most brilliant exploits. Previous to the departure of the troops I had directed Captain Duane, of the Engineer Corps, to proceed to Barrett's Ferry, near the mouth of the Chickahominy, and throw across the river at that point a pontoon bridge. This was executed promptly and satisfactorily under the cover of gunboats, and an excellent bridge of about 2,000 feet in length was ready for the first arrival of troops. The greater part of the army, with its artillery, wagon trains, &c., crossed it rapidly and in perfect order and safety, so that on the night of the 17th everything was across the Chickahominy except the rear guard, which crossed early on the morning of the 18th, when the pontoon bridge was immediately removed.

General Porter's corps, which was the first to march from Harrison's Landing, had been pushed forward rapidly, and on the 16th reached Williamsburg, where I had directed him to halt until the entire army was across the Chickahominy. On his arrival at Williamsburg, however, he received an intercepted letter, which led to the belief that General Pope would have to contend against a very heavy force then in his front. General Porter therefore very properly took the responsibility of continuing his march directly on the Newport News, which place he reached on the morning of the 18th of August, having marched his corps 60 miles in the short period of three days and one night, halting one day at the crossing of the Chickahominy.