War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0088 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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I learn that wharf accommodations at Aquia are altogether inadequate for landing troops and supplies to any large extent. Not an hour should be lost in remedying this.

Great delay will ensue there from shallow water. You will find a vast deficiency in horse transport. We had nearly two hundred when we came here; I learn of only twenty provided now; they carry about 50 horses each. More hospital accommodations should be provided. We are much impeded here because our wharves are used night and day to land current supplies. At Monroe a similar difficulty will occur.

With all the facilities at Alexandria and Washington six weeks, about, were occupied in embarking this army and its material.

Burnside's troops are not a fair criterion for rate of embarkation. All his means were in hand, his outfit specially prepared for the purpose, and his men habituated to the movement.

Burnside's troops are not a fair criterion for rate of embarkation. All his means were in hand, his outfit specially prepared for the purpose, and his men habituated to the movement.

There shall be no unnecessary delay, but I cannot manufacture vessels. I state these difficulties from experience, and because it appears to me that we have been lately working at cross purpose because you have not been properly informed by those around you, who ought to know the inherent difficulties of such an undertaking. It is not possible for any one to place this army where you wish it, ready to move, in less than a month. If Washington is in danger now this army can scarcely arrive in time to save it. It is much better position to do so from here than from Aquia.

Our material can only be saved by using the whole army to cover it if we are pressed. If sensibly weakened by detachments the result might be the loss of much material and many men. I will be at the telegraph office to-morrow morning to talk with you.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington, D. C.

To the reasons given in the foregoing dispatch to show why General Burnside's movement from Fort Monroe was not a fair criterion for our operations the following may be added:

He was not encumbered by either sick or wounded men. He had no cavalry, artillery, wagons, or teams. His force consisted of infantry alone, with a few ambulances and officers' horses. His baggage was already on the transports, where it had remained since his arrival from North Carolina, and his men had only to resume their places on board.

The cavalry and artillery mentioned in my dispatches of the 7th, 10th, and 11th were sent to supply his total deficiency in those arms.

I may also repeat that the vessels used by General Burnside had not returned from Aquia Creek when the army left Harrison's Bar.

It will be seen by the concluding paragraph of the foregoing dispatch that in order to have a more direct, speedy, and full explanation of the condition of affairs in the army than I could by sending a single dispatch by steamer to the nearest telegraph office at Jamestown Island, some 70 miles distant, and waiting ten hours for a reply, I proposed to go in person to the office. This I did. On my arrival at Jamestown Island there was an interruption in the electric current, which rendered it necessary for me to continue on to Fort Monroe and across the Chesapeake Bay to Cherrystone Inlet, on the Eastern Shore, where I arrived late in the evening, and immediately sent the annexed dispatches:

CHERRYSTONE, August 13, 1862-11.30 p.m.

Please come to office; with to talk to you. What news from Pope?

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington.

CHERRYSTONE INLET, August 14, 1862-12.30 a.m.

Started to Jamestown Island to talk with you; found cable broken and came here and came here. Please read my long telegram. (See above dispatch of August 12-11 p.m.) All quiet at camp. Enemy burned wharves at city Point yesterday. No rebel pickets within 8 miles of Coggins' Point yesterday. Richmond prisoners state that large force, with guns, left Richmond northward on Sunday.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington.