War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0082 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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most of my power, directing to the movement, which I clearly foresee will be one of the utmost delicacy and difficulty, whatever skill I may possess. Whatever the result may be-and may God grant that I am mistaken in my foreboding-I shall at least have the internal satisfaction that I have written and spoken frankly, and have sought to do the best in my power to avert disaster from my country.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding U. S. Army.

Soon after sending this telegram I received the following I received the following in reply to mine of 11 p.m. of the 3rd:

WASHINGTON, August 4, 1862-12. 45 p.m.

My telegram to you of yesterday will satisfy you in regard to future operations. It was expected that you would have sent off your sick as directed without waiting to know what were or would be the intentions of the Government respecting future movements. The President expects that the instructions which were sent you yesterday with his approval will be carried out with all possible dispatch and caution. The Quartermaster-General is sending to Fort Monroe all the transportation he can collect.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN.

Tho which the following is my reply:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Berkeley, August 5, 1862-7 a.m.

Your telegram of yesterday received, and is being carried out as promptly as possible. With the means at my command no human power could have moved the sick in the time you say you expected them to be moved.

* * * * * *

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding U. S. Army.

My efforts for bringing about a change of policy were unsuccessful, as will be seen from the following telegram and letter received by me in reply to mine of 12 m. of the 4th:

WASHINGTON, August 5, 1862-12 m.

You cannot regret the order of the withdrawal more than I did the necessity of giving it. It will not be rescinded, and you will be expected to execute it with all possible promptness. It is believed that it can be done now without serious danger. This may not be so, if there should be any delay. I will write you my views more fully by mail.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN.

The letter was as follows:

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, August 6, 1862.

GENERAL: Your telegram of yesterday was received this morning, and I immediately telegraphed you a brief reply, promising to write you more fully by mail.

You, general, certainly could not have been more pained at receiving my order than I was at the necessity of issuing it. I was advised by high officers, in whose judgment I had great confidence, to make the order immediately on my arrival here, but I determined not to do so until I could learn your wishes from a personal interview; and even after that interview I tried every means in my power to avoid withdrawing your army, and delayed my decision as long as I dared to delay it. I assure you, general, it was not a hasty and inconsiderate act, but one that caused me more anxious thoughts than any other of my life; but after full and mature consideration of all the pros and