War of the Rebellion: Serial 012 Page 0050 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

burg road was a large open field; beyond that a swampy belt of timber, some 500 yards wide, which had been disputed ground for many days. Farther in advance was an open field, crossed by the Williamsburg road and the railroad, and commanded by a redoubt and rifle-pits of the enemy.

It was decided to push our lines to the other side of these woods, in order to enable us to ascertain the nature of the ground and to place Generals Heintzelman and Sumner in position to support the attack intended to be made on the Old Tavern on the 26th or 27th by General Franklin by assailing that position in the rear.

Between 8 and 9 o'clock on the morning of the 25th the advance was begun by General Heintzelman's corps. The enemy were found to be in strong force all along the line and contested the advance stubbornly, but by sunset our object was accomplished. The troops engaged in this affair were the whole of Heintzelman's corps, Palmer's brigade of Couch's division of Keyes' corps, and a part of Richardson's division of Sumner's corps. For the details I refer to the report of General Heintzelman.

The casualties (not including those in Palmer's brigade, which have not been reported) were as follows: Officers killed, 1; wounded, 14; missing, 1; enlisted men killed, 50; wounded, 387; missing, 63; total, 516.*

The following telegrams were sent to the Secretary of War during the day from the field of operations:

REDOUBT Numbers 3, June 25, 1862-1.30 p. m.

We have advanced our pickets on the left considerably, under sharp resistance. Our men behaved very handsomely. Some firing still continues.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

REDOUBT Numbers 3, June 25, 1862-3.15 p. m.

The enemy are making a desperate resistance to the advance of our picket lines. Kearny's and one-half of Hooker's are where I want them.

I have this moment re-enforced Hooker's right with a brigade and a couple of guns, and hope in a few minutes to finish the work intended for to-day. Our men are behaving splendidly. The enemy are fighting well also. This is not a battle; merely an affair of Heintzelman's corps, supported by Keyes, and thus far all goes well. We hold every foot we have gained.

If we succeed in what we have undertaken it will be a very important advantage gained. Loss not large thus far. The fighting up to this time has been done by General Hooker's division, which has behaved as usual-that is, most splendidly.

On our right Porter has silenced the enemy's batteries in his front.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

REDOUBT Numbers 3, June 25, 1862-5 p. m.

The affair is over, and we have gained our point fully and with but little loss, notwithstanding the strong opposition. Our men have done all that could be desired. The affair was partially decided by two guns that Captain De Russy brought gallantly into action under very difficult circumstances. The enemy was driven from the camps in front of this place and is now quiet.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

---------------

*But see revised statement, Part II, pp. 37, 38.

---------------