War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0633 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS, Corinth, June 8, 1862.

General BUELL:

General Mitchel telegraphs that he cannot do anything in repairing railroads this side of Decatur.

Have you any reason to think the enemy are in sufficient force to prevent General Wood from occupying and repairing that line? If not, please order it.

Just heard from Jackson. Our forces drove out the enemy, taking the place. They fled, leaving their dinner behind them. They have burned a bridge 6 miles beyond.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS, June 8, 1862.

General HALLECK:

The enemy undoubtedly has a pretty strong cavalry force and some artillery and infantry between Tuscumbia and Decatur. I should prefer to have an entire division between those points. That was my first arrangement, having another division for Bear Creek and Buzzard Roost Creek Bridges, which I have directed General Wood to work on at the same time. To put one division to cover at the same time the entire distance from Bear Creek to Decatur would probably expose them to annoyance, which they would not be in force enough to chastise, and which might in the long run retard the completion of the work.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS, June 8, 1862.

General HALLECK:

As the removal of the Engineer Regiment from my command supersedes the arrangement I have made for repairing the Decatur road I assign General Smith to other duty.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS, June 9, 1862.

General HALLECK:

The following just received from General Mitchel,dated 9th, viz:

Owing to intelligence received from Colonel Lester I have very reluctantly ordered the return of the forces of General Negley. I deem this a most important step, for I am quite certain the enemy will follow. If supplies can be sent to Bainbridge Ferry, 7 miles above Florence, the distance to Florence is less than 40 miles and the route far superior to any other.

It is my duty to again repeat the opinion already expressed, that we ought to occupy the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad with a powerful force, and if not done very soon the enemy will do it.

O. M. MITCHEL.

It will be seen by the foregoing that General Mitchel has anticipated the orders I sent him this morning.

D. C. BUELL.