War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0618 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Huntsville, April [14], 1862.

General D. C. BUELL,

Care General Dumont:

We captured to-day the inclosed dispatch in cipher from General Beauregard. The cipher has proved as little effectual in holding back the Third Division of your army as the destruction of bridges. We have deciphered the cipher and we read as follows:

CORINTH, April 9.

General S. COOPER, Richmond, Va.:

All present probabilities are that whenever the enemy moves on this position he will do so with an overwhelming force of not less that 85,000 men. We can now muster only about 35,000 effectives. Van Dorn may possibly join us in a few days with about 15,000 more. Can we not re-enforced from Pemberton's army? If defeated here we loss the Mississippi Valley and probably our cause; whereas we could even afford to lose for a while Charleston and Savannah for the purpose of defeating Buell's army, which would not only insure us the Valley of the Mississippi, but our independence.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

Very respectfully,

O. M. MITCHEL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Division.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

No. 17.

Camp, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 19, 1862.

The following general order to the Governor and commander-in-chief of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has been officially received and is published to the military and naval forces in this department:

GENERAL ORDERS,

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS,

No. 6.

Headquarters, Boston, April 10, 1862.

In honor of the most signal victories recently won by the soldiers of the Union in the department commanded by Major-General Halleck, under the more immediate leadership of Major-General Pope, Grant, and Buell, and by the sailors and marines commanded by Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, and as a humble expression of the grateful joy with which the splendid results of the heroic valor, energy, and good conduct of these commanders, their officers and men, is received by their breather and fellow-citizens of Massachusetts, it is ordered by the Governor and commander-in-chief of the military of Massachusetts that a salute of one hundred guns be fired on Boston Common to-morrow, the 11th day of April, current, at noon.

Not even the cannon's voice can loudly enough proclaim the debt which our country, human liberty, and civilization itself owe to these noble men of the West, who have met the angriest torrents of the rebellion and rolled its waves back upon their depths. The heart of every son of Massachusetts leaps to salute them and do them homage.

Major-General Andrews, commanding First Division, is charged with the execution of this order.

By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and

commander-in-chief.

WILLIAM SCHOULER,

Adjutant-General.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. McLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Huntsville, April 20, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

Your order to burn the Bridgeport Bridge is received. A regiment of infantry and a company of cavalry now occupy Bellefonte, 10 miles