War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0603 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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CAMP AT WEST FULTON, ON TOMBIGBEE, MISSISSIPPI, June 9, 1862-6.30 p.m.

General VAN DORN:

Mr. Dulaney, a reliable citizen of this vicinity, reached my camp an hour since, and stated to me that the Federals in large force entered Baldwyn at an early hour this morning. They reported their strength to be 15,000. The informant estimate their force at 10,000. The enemy took him prisoner, and stated to him that they would occupy Fulton before to-morrow noon. I also have information from several sources (undoubted) that they occupy Marietta. The information as to the occupation of Baldwyn and Marietta in force I deem entirely reliable. What the forces is I cannot say. I am on the west bank of the river, 2 miles from Fulton. The whole command here numbers some 400 cavalry, Colonel Bradfute being in command. I deemed it important to communicate this information to you at the earliest period.

Very respectfully.

J. D. BENNETT,

Lieutenant-Colonel,&c.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. S. M. BARTON,

On cars at Laudon;

Telegram from General Smith say enemy is crossing the river. Push on rapidly and telegraph him from different points on [the] route where you are.

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 9, 1862.

Major-General E. KIRBY SMITH:

Barton's command has been delayed; are now all gone. He is directed to telegraph you from stations on the route and to hasten on.

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, Salt Sulphur Springs, June 9, 1862.

Major W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General;

MAJOR: The enemy is still at Flat Top Mountain, on the one side of New River and Meadow Bluff on the other. The necessity of keeping a guard upon the numerous passes with the small command we have prevents my combining our forces on the side or the other and striking him, without seriously endangering the railroad or

salt-works.

We are watching his movements closely, and if he gives us the least opportunity we will attack him.

Cannot General Marshall be given a command somewhere else? He is undoubtedly an officer of great mind and experience, and cold no doubt render great service in some field where his talents could have a