War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0588 KY., TENN., N. MISS. N.ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXII.

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you to Carrollville. If the enemy have pickets there we must force them back and occupy the ground, throwing cavalry in front.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General, &c.

[Indorsement.]

Received June 5, 1862-2.30 p.m

GEORGE WILLIAMSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Major-General POLK:

GENERAL: I have ordered General Cheatham to have Maney's brigade prepared for outpost duty, with three days' rations in haversacks, and to send his wagons with baggage, commissary stores, and one-half of his ammunition to the rear when your corps moves from its present position. I have also directed Colonel Adams to hold a squadron of cavalry (consisting of not less than 150 men) ready to move at a moment's notice; to have three days' rations prepared for them, and to have in wagons, ready to move, three days' forage, to be placed at a point convenient to the squadron when it may be ordered out.

Your obedient servant,

GEORGE WILLIAMSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

June 5, 1862-11.30 p.m.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

DEAR SIR: A part of my reserve artillery, scarcely efficient, has gone to the rear, the balance having joined the command here. We have more than I think can be used effectively and more than we can support. As the prospect of getting off is not bright, I will not start my wagons early to-morrow. A staff officer from Saltillo to-day reports very large supplies of ordnance, &c., to ship from there. Everything has been perfectly quiet with the enemy.

Yours, very respectfully, &c.

BRAXTON BRAGG.

MEMPHIS, TENN., June 5, 1862

Brigadier-General RUGGLES, C. S. A.,

Gayoso House, Memphis, Tenn.:

GENERAL: As senior officer accessible I beg leave to make you statement and ask your advice or orders. I have been for several months commanding various companies of Confederate troops, who are volunteers from the District of Missouri State Guard, which I have the honor to command. A portion of these troops, viz, three companies of artillery and five of infantry (since consolidated into three), were ordered to the River Defense Fleet as mariners and gunners under my special command. These companies, that with avidity embraced the opportunity of serving their country on so dangerous and responsible a duty, have since become dissatisfied,and from my duties to my