War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0579 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

If we are allowed to place the mortars on rafts and permitted to use the transports and play strategy back on the enemy, I will contract to hold this river above Memphis for a month.

M. JEFF. THOMPSON.

MEMPHIS, June 3, 1862

General RUGGLES, Grenada:

I will promptly obey your instructions. I will do the best I can to hold the enemy in check at all points. I think that the fleet ought to be kept above. Shall I detain remainder of troops as they arrive? The troops have only five days' rations.

Rations had better be forwarded to Hernando, if I detain them here:

so that if it runs short it can be procured easily. No batteries of any kind here, except those that will arrive to night.

THOS. H. ROSSER,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

MEMPHIS, June 3, 1862

General RUGGLES, Grenada:

The Golden Age passed down this morning from Fort Pillow with troops for Vicksburg. We may have about 200 troops here on whom to depend, and can make on defense, except against a very meager force.

We shall remain till everything is shipped and as much longer as possible.

Nearly everything has been forwarded. Will finish to-day probably.

THOS. H. ROSSER,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

MEMPHIS, June 3, 1862

General RUGGLES, Grenada:

Fort Pillow is evacuated. I left the fort this morning myself. The remainder of the ammunition and 600 troops were taken by steamer Golden Age this morning to Vicksburg. The remainder of the troops, with General Villepigue, are coming by land. There is neither arms nor powder here.

In view of the importance of holding Memphis, public meetings have been held and addressed by General Thompson, Colonel Rosser, and Captain Baird, with the most discouraging results. Colonel Foute will leave on the evening train for Grenada, and will explain to you the true condition of things here. Captain Baird will accompany him.

CHARLES JONES.

MEMPHIS, June 3, 1862

General RUGGLES, Grenada:

As I have telegraphed several times, there is no force here of any moment. Might possibly raise about 300 men. The citizens are not disposed to assist. It might be well for you to come and see for your-