War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0569 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - CONFEDERATE

Search Civil War Official Records

P. S.- A regiment was left to guard the crossings of Tuscumbia from Jacinto to Rienzi, about one and two miles from latter place. Send it an order in time to join you at Rienzi.

HEADQUARTERS FORCES,

Twenty Mile Creek Railroad Bridge,

------

,----, 1862.

General BEAUREGARD,

Baldwyn, Miss.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I am in command of three regiments of infantry at this place, numbering 1,000 all told, and three companies of worn-down cavalry, numbering about 175, and that I am without orders, having up to this moment protected the numerous railroad bridges in this swamp. I learn from couriers that the enemy are advancing by the Carrollville or Blackland road. They can also approach Baldwyn easily by a road running 1 1/2 miles east of this place. On that road there is a good road bridge, which can be easily destroyed. Shall I cut down the railroad bridges and obstruct the country roads?

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

J. A. ORR,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS INDEPENDENT BRIGADE,

Twenty Mile Creek, Miss.,

-------

,----, 1862-6.30 o'clock.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

Baldwyn, Miss.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that a scout sent out by me to-day reports that he was informed, in a neighborhood 7 miles east of this point, that a cavalry force of the enemy was preparing to make a raid to-day or to-night on Saltilo by the Cotton-Gin road. He does not state that he saw the preparations being made, nor that his informant saw them, nor the number of the enemy. I suppose it would be proper to make this report to General Bragg; but I am not informed where he has established his quarters.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

J. A. ORR,

Colonel, Commanding.

OFFICE OF THE MISSISSIPPI CENTRAL RAILROAD CO.,

Holly Springs, Miss., May 31, 1862

Major General BRAXTON BRAGG:

DEAR SIR: The greater importance of preserving the engines, cars, and materials of this road for the future use of the Confederacy impels me to send a special messenger to you to ascertain whether we should remove from this point. As it will require several days to do so, and the removal of stationary shop machinery will involve incalculable loss to the road and diminish our ability to transport men and munitions, I ask this information, and shall abide by your advice. All our own and the rolling stock of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad are now on this line and mostly at this point; hence my anxiety to act in