War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0511 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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It is of the utmost importance that any renewed attempts to remove the obstructions at Big Creek Gap be promptly met and prevented by your force in such manner as may be most advisable. If necessary Colonel A. W. Reynolds' command, at Clinton, can be called upon to co-operate with you.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Aide-de-Camp

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST,

Camp Churchill Clark, May 11, 1862-8.45 p.m.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

GENERAL: Colonel Bradfute, in charge of my pickets, reports that drums can be heard from the railroad station (Pickett) in the direction of Farmington or a little east of it. A report has just been made by the picket at Morrison's Mill that two rockets went up about half an hour since in the same direction the drums were heard. An old man reported this evening to the picket at Morrison's Mill that the enemy were crossing at the tan-yard in force. This cannot be so, as I have pickets there, and have received no report of any such thing. I have pickets there, and have received no report of any such thing. I have two companies of infantry near Frost's Mill, with cavalry in advance. I expect Captain Reves to-night, who will give me definite information.

Respectfully,

EARL VAN DORN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. FOURTH REGIMENT TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS,

May 11, 1862.

General CLARK:

The enemy are in large force in front of us this morning, and from the music I judge they are having review and inspection. Our cavalry pickets report their camps distant from us about 1 1/2 miles. They approached much nearer to us last night than they were yesterday. They have not approached our pickets this morning. No guns have been fired; our scouts, however, think we will be attacked to-day. They are not advancing on our left.

Respectfully,

O. F. STRAHL,

Colonel, Commanding Fourth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, May 11, 1862.

Colonel R. J. MORGAN,

Thirty-sixth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers:

COLONEL: I am directed by Major General E. Kirby Smith to say that, owing to the peculiar circumstances under which your regiment was organized and the evil influences surrounding it, some unfaithful members have been received into it. Removed from contact with the disloyal element of East Tennessee and to a purer political atmosphere,