War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0499 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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road are all east of the Farmington and Purdy road; those north of that road are 2 1/2 miles east of this place and 1 1/2 miles above the State-line road. Whether there be any north of this place or not I have not learned, and I have sent as far as 6 miles out.

From all I can learn through citizens, pickets,and the Yankee drums, the main army are bearing in the direction of Farmington and Burnsville; only the right wing will touch Corinth, unless their movements are changed. I learned through citizens that a party of Federals came out some 8 or 9 miles above here and burned a bridge on the railroad. I send in a man unable for duty, with 3 mules, taken up near the Yankee lines.

Please pass the complainant to camp.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. C. BACOT,

Commanding Cavalry.

AT HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, May 6, 1862.

Brigadier-General DONELSON,

Commanding First Brigade, Corinth, Miss.:

SIR: I sent out this morning, just before sending in my last report, two scouts, one on the State-line road and another on the Corinth and Chambers road. The first report that they found the enemy about 3 miles east of Chambers, on the State-line road, supposed to be about 400 in number. They fired on the advance, killing 1 man, when the others retired. The last scout returned, stating they saw 2 Yankee cavalrymen, who retired on their approach, when they could se nothing more of them. This occurred south of the State-line road, about 2 1/2 miles east of Chambers Station. Others came in from a northerly direction, stating all things quiet as far as Muddy Creek.

In submitting this, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. C. BACOT,

Commanding Cavalry, C. S.

ARTILLERY OFFICE, HDQRS. SECOND GRAND DIVISION,

ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, May 6, 1862.

Brigadier-General RUGGLES,

Commanding Division:

SIR: I have the honor to submit a report of the heavy batteries in your division under my command. They consist of two rifled 6-pounders, brass, placed upon our extreme right, next the railroad, manned by a detachment of the Washington Artillery, of New Orleans; one smooth 12-pounder siege gun, mounted to the right of the Farmington road, and manned by Captain Rice's company, as is also the 24-pounder siege gun, smooth, placed on the left of the same road. Next to this comes a 24-pounder siege gun, rifled, which commands the Farmington road for nearly three-quarters of a mile. This gun is manned by Captain Bain's company of light artillery.

The next gun, which is about 300 or 400 yards farther to the left, is a brass 12-pounder, rifled, and is so placed as to get a raking fire up the Monterey road and a cross-fire upon all the cleared ground in front of