War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0460 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, April 28, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

I have not more than 500 troops at Chattanooga, which is in great danger. The enemy are at Stevenson. Cannot re-enforcements be sent there from Georgia or Alabama.

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, April 28, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that a portion of the Fourth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, Colonel Morgan, will leave to-day for Milledgeville, Ga., in charge of Union prisoners. The officer of the detachment is directed to report afterward with his command to the military authorities at Savannah, Ga.

In more than one communication Brigadier-General Stevenson has reported many desertions from this regiment to the enemy, and urged its removal from Cumberland Gap. Because of this and the general character of the regiment for disloyalty, I have thought it best to send it beyond the limits of this department. Being thus removed beyond the influence of friends in the ranks of the enemy, it is though these men may make loyal and good soldiers.

I trust my action in this matter will meet the approval of the Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, April 28, 1862.

Brig. General D. LEADBETTER,

Commanding, &c., Chattanooga, Tenn.:

GENERAL: I am directed by Major-General E. Kirby Smith to say that he telegraphed you on yesterday, asking what force and what time you would require to carry out our view in regard to obstructing the enemy in his operations at Mud Creek. General Smith also desires to be informed if petards are placed for blowing up the bridge at Bridgeport. Arrangements for its destruction should be completed at once. The removal of all bridges in the rear of the enemy toward Nashville and Huntsville is greatly desired, and should be accomplished if practicable. The general has no information of re-enforcements reaching Nashville; their force at that point is stated at five regiments.

Colonel Smith should be arrested upon the first pretext, and his regiment placed under the command of an efficient officer. It this cannot be done, select the best companies and organize them into a battalion,