War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0408 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

Search Civil War Official Records

to report them, and thereby bring down a retaliation on the part of the Federal troops much more harsh and severe than any that we could have the heart to show our enemies. I have therefore determined not to arrest any Union sympathizers unless known to be aiding and abetting the enemy.

I have made a reconnaissance of the country above this, and am of the opinion that there is no line nearer to the enemy than the one from Dresden through this place across to Dyersburg to be convenient to a telegraph office. There seems to be but little disposition displayed by the citizens of Weakley and Obion Counties to sell provisions and forage to the Confederate Government, since they invariably refuse to take Confederate notes in payment.

The Obion bottoms are at present almost impassable, which will prevent my forming a new line above this point. I can guard the line, however, by sending out from time to time strong scouting parties to operate in the country about Union City and Dresden.

The independent companies attached to my command are an expense to the Confederacy and do very little service, since they are not acquainted with the country. I would respectfully recommend the merging of all these companies (with the exception of Dillard's) into one, and have the election of company officers, then muster them into one, and have the election of company officers, then muster them into service for the war, and if they do not wish to do this, discharge them. They are now a heavy expense for the service rendered. Captain D. G. Reid, with a squad of 15 men, is operating on my line under the authority of General Beauregard, and I would state for the information of the general commanding that he is doing great damage to our cause. He is reported to me by good citizens to be engaged in taking horses from Union men on the line and near Dresden, thereby causing the Union men to retaliate upon our friends; in fact, I consider the party a nuisance, and have the honor to request his removal from my line.

I was sufficiently near Island 10 on last Sunday and Monday to hear the firing, which was very heavy. I presume you have heard the result; it is reported by parties from there that one gunboat ran by the island on Friday night and two more on Sunday night; our batteries were abandoned and spiked Monday and the infantry force surrendered on Tuesday morning; a good many poor made their escape and are coming in here daily.

Captain Neely's company arrived here to-day; Haywood's company not yet arrived. I would respectfully request that Captain Robertson's company be ordered here at once, as I need them very much. I have lost the copies of my order and my report of the Union City affair, and would like to have copies of both sent me. For the present my headquarters will be at this place.

I am, major, with high respect, your obedient servant,

W. H. JACKSON,

Colonel, Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth, Miss., April 10, 1862.

SOLDIERS:Your late commander-in-chief, General A. S. Johnston, is dead.

A fearless soldier, a sagacious captain, a reproachless man, has fallen; one who in his devotion to our cause shrank from no sacrifice; one who, animated by a sense of duty and sustained by a sublime courage, challenged