War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0407 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

report as soon as practicable to these headquarters all casualties and condition of armament.

By command of Major-General Bragg:

GILES B. COOKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

RICHMOND, April 10, 1862.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Corinth, Miss.:

There are no more arms here. A few may be got ready by the end of the week.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, VA., April 10, 1862.

Governor SHORTER,

Alabama:

General Beauregard must have re-enforcements to meet the vast accumulation of the enemy before him. The necessity is imminent; the case of vital importance. Send forward to Corinth all the armed men you can furnish.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

(Same to Governors of Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. See also pp.432-435, Series I, Vol. VI.)

CORINTH, April 10, 1862.

General SAMUEL JONES:

We gained a most complete victory on the 6th, remaining master of the field, all the enemy's encampments, and several fine batteries.

Next day, finding Buell's forces arriving on the field to re-enforce Grant, I withdrew, bringing away one of the enemy's finest batteries. In a few days all will be ready for another victory. As soon as I can ascertain the number of arms unemployed I will accept the men offered.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY,

Trenton, Tenn., April 10, 1862.

Major GEORGE WILLIAMSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Corinth, Miss.:

MAJOR:I have just returned from a five days' scout in the direction of Hickman; remained one night at Union City, and thence toward Dresden. The enemy's cavalry did not make their appearance. I found everything quiet on my line. The Union feeling throughout the upper country is very strong, and the management of these men is one of the most delicate and perplexing of all to me. Our Southern friends beseech me not to interfere with the Union men, since they will be certain