War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0403 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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CORINTH, MISS., April 9, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Richmond, Va.:

All present probabilities are that whenever the enemy moves on this position he will do so with an overwhelming force of not less than 85,000 men. We can now muster only about 35,000 effectives. Van Dorn may possibly join us in a few days with about 15,000 more. Can we not be re-enforced from Pemberton's army? If defeated here we lose the Mississippi Valley and probably our cause, whereas we could even afford to lose for a while Charleston and Savannah for the purpose of defeating Buell's army, which would not only insure us the valley of the Mississippi, but our independence.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

MICKEY'S, April 9, 1862-9.30 a.m.

Colonel JORDAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Corinth, Miss.:

The flag had gone forward; no answer yet. The 40 mules were driven forward yesterday by the Texas Rangers.

I have just learned, through a note from Lieutenant. Colonel D. C. Kelley, commanding Forrest's cavalry, that General Chalmers left Monterey for Corinth, I presume last evening, with his whole brigade. The Texas Rangers were covering Monterey, and Colonel Adams is now on his way there. I will get the rest of the wounded off in a few hours, and nearly everything is well forward, except some tents and rubbish.

My men, from fatigue, false alarms, and exposure without tents, or even blankets, are thoroughly worn-out, and I respectfully suggest that I ought to move on and other troops be sent to relieve me whenever they may meet me on the Ridge road.

Please send answer by a courier.

Respectfully,

JNumbers C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

P. S.-Colonel Wheeler, of Nineteenth Alabama Regiment, is with me with the remnant of his command, and suggests that while he thinks his regiment (now numbering about 100 men for duty) had better go on, he is quite well enough to take charge of any troops sent on. I regret to be obliged to say that I am very unwell and nearly unfit for duty.

MICKEY'S, April 9, 1862-5.30 p.m.

Colonel JORDAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Corinth, Miss.:

SIR: The officer bearing the flag of truce was stopped by a picket some 4 miles from here. He says that as far as he could observe they seemed to be burying dead, looking after wounded, and putting their camps to rights.

With thirty wagons more everything can be sent forward from this place.

Respectfully,

JNumbers C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

P. S.-This is written upon the return of the flag of truce.