War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0398 KY.,TENN.,N. MISS.,N. ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXII.

Search Civil War Official Records

spare them for that purpose and their terms of service be sufficiently long to justify the step.

The Tennessee troops under General Johnston can be sent to you. I trust that our late success in the Southwest will have a good effect upon the people among whom you are operating.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

BRIDGEPORT, April 7, 1862.

Captain THOMAS M. SCOTT,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chattanooga:

Don't send train or troops. I am satisfied from examinations of Major Lea and myself that the enemy has taken the back track.

I will go to the tunnel in hopes of catching him. Don't send rations and powder.

S. B. MAXEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CORINTH, April 8, 1862.

General SAMUEL JONES, Commanding:

Please grant no passes to this place to ladies coming to visit the wounded, for I am expecting another battle here.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

MEMPHIS, April 8, 1862.

General VAN DORN:

Hurry forward your command; think General Beauregard wants you.

JOHN ADAMS,

Captain, Commanding.

THREE MILES ON ROAD FROM MICKEY'S TO CORINTH, April 8, 1862-7.30 a. m.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: Our condition is horrible. Troops utterly disorganized and demoralized. Road almost impassable. No provisions and no forage; consequently everything is feeble. Straggling parties may get in to-night. Those in rear will suffer much. The rear guard, Breckinridge commanding, is left at Mickey's in charge of wounded, &c. The enemy, up to daylight, had not pursued. Have ordered Breckinridge to hold on till pressed by the enemy, but he will suffer for want of food. Can any fresh troops, with five days' rations, be sent to his relief?

It is most lamentable to see the state of affairs, but I am powerless and almost exhausted.

Our artillery is being left all along the road by its officers; indeed I find but few officers with their men.