War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0379 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. THIRD ARMY CORPS, ARMY OF THE MISS., Corinth, April 1, 1862.

Major-General BRAGG,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your orders I visited the command at Iuka yesterday, and made as thorough an investigation of the reports against Major-General Crittenden and Brigadier-General Carroll as opportunity afforded. I found sufficient evidence against them to require their arrest. I accordingly arrested Brigadier-General Carroll last night, and this morning ordered Brigadier-General Wood to relieve Major-General Crittenden of the command of that place. The latter was ordered to consider himself in arrest for drunkenness, after turning over his command. I arrested Brigadier-General Carroll for drunkenness, incompetency, and neglect of his command.

I caused an inspection of the guards of three regiments to be made by Major Shoup, of my staff, and his report shows a most wretched state of discipline and instruction.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

W. J. HARDEE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD ARMY CORPS, Corinth, April 1, 1862.

Major General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I am greatly in want of 73,000 Enfield cartridges and 6,000 Minie. I have 1,060 Enfield guns and only 31,000 cartridges. I was told on my arrival here that the Enfield ammunition had been sent by mistake to Grenada, and would be returned here immediately. I learned this evening that 47,000 Enfield cartridges would be here to-morrow, and this was all the Ordnance Department had, and this was subject to your order. Can I [have] this ammunition when it arrives?

Very respectfully,

W. J. HARDEE,

Major-General.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, April 1, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Inclosed herewith I hand you the report of Flag-Officer Hollins, complaining that his guns were taken from him, and taken without notice or explanation by officers of the Army. These guns were sent for a gunboat at Memphis which was not ready to receive them, but are required by other vessels at New Orleans, and, if I am correctly advised, should be sent there at once, and I request that orders be given to this effect.

The Louisiana, I learn, is ready for her guns; but even if she should not be, the officers must have some time to practice their men at them.

Captain Hollins feels indignant at the apparent disrespect thus exhibited toward him; and it is evident that seizures thus made, while they can do but little good, have a tendency to excite dissension be-