War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0329 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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position is in great danger. The enemy is pressing it now with a vastly superior force, say from 15,000 to 20,000 to our 6,000.

On Thursday they attempted to carry our works on the Missouri side by assault, making several efforts, in which they were repulsed with very heavy losses (several hundred), whilst ours was trifling-2 killed and 5 wounded. This report was from official sources.

Could we be spared from this position, a descent with some 10,000 on that position would be attended with great results.

Keep me fully advised of all that occurs. A telegraph is ordered from your position to this. Aid the manager by all means in your power.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

Major-General, Commanding.

MARCH 15, 1862.

Major-General BRAGG:

General Gladden reported yesterday but one bridge destroyed. To-day I have not been able to hear from him.

I have four trains at Bethel and tried to get them back, and as they did not come down at 12.30 p. m., I sent a hand-car to ascertain the cause of detention. It has not yet returned (9 p. m.), and no news has been received by expressmen. The train has fallen in torrents. I have been obliged to halt a company of cavalry and two batteries of guns already considerably advanced on the road to Purdy.

I have been ready to move with a strong force all day, but could not do so until the condition of things could be ascertained. The telegraph would not work, and I could not answer your questions.

DANIEL RUGGLES.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, SECOND GRAND DIVISION, Corinth, Miss., March 15, 1862.

[General BRAGG?]:

I have the honor to transmit the following notes, just received, for your information:

IUKA, MISS., March 15, 1862.

I give you the following as the substance of the reports from my scouts who are on the other side of the river. The forces at Savannah variously estimated at from 100 men to 30,000. All agree that there are seventy vessels. They have been here two days without attempting to land. It was said that Buell was advancing upon Florence and a column from Columbus on Memphis. The roads from Savannah to Florence very bad. River very high. No approach of enemy at Eastport.

JAMES R. CHALMERS,

Brigadier-General.

TENNESSEE RIVER, NEAR RED SULPHUR SPRINGS, Friday [March 14]-7 p. m.

I write in haste to inform you that several of the enemy's gunboats and a large number of transports have just passed this point, going up the river. I was unable to ascertain the number of men on board.

10 o'clock p. m.-Information just received "that the enemy is landing troops at the mouth of Yellow Creek," about 2 1/2 miles from this place. I have just returned from making a reconnaissance. Found fifteen or twenty of their boats lying at the