War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0325 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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gion have done to him great damage-washing away his supplies and wagons and drowning (I hear) some of his men.

Respectfully, &c.,

H. MARSHALL,

Brigadier-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., March 14, 1862.

General A. SIDNEY JOHNSTON,

Decatur, Ala.:

I have just received information that the enemy crossed the Cumberland Mountains near Jacksborough this morning and captured our cavalry companies there. They are reported moving in considerable force toward Clinton. I have about 2,000 available troops, and will order up General Floyd's brigade, which will make about 2,000 in all.

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, March 14, 1862.

Colonel W. W. MACKALL,

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Western Dept., Decatur, Ala.:

COLONEL: In your communication of the 12th instant you inform me that my "department is bounded on the west by the railroad line from Nashville to Columbus." My orders and instructions from the War Department only place me in command of the District of East Tennessee, comprising the country east of the Cumberland Range. There appears to be some misunderstanding. If my command is to be raised to a department, it should be done so in general orders.

I inclose you a copy of a letter sent to me from the Adjutant-General's office.* East Tennessee is an enemy's country; its people beyond the influence and control of our troops and in open rebellion. The force here at present is barely more than sufficient to guard the porkeries and the line of the railroads. If under these circumstances you deem it advisable, I will turn over the defense of the district to the militia, and willingly and gladly join you with such portion of my command as you may direct.

Very respectfully,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Numbers 3.

Jackson, Tenn., March 14, 1862.

I. Field and company officers are specially enjoined to instruct their men, under all circumstances, to fire with deliberation at the feet of the enemy; they will thus avoid overshooting, and, besides, wounded men give more trouble to our adversary than his dead, as they have to be taken from the field.

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*Not found.

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