War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0303 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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boats at Paris Landing is fourteen, and a larger number at the other landings. Three boats loaded with troops passed mouth of Sandy upward bound this morning; the others loading and preparing to leave.

Later.-Citizens in this afternoon from Canton, on Cumberland River, report large bodies of troops having passed that place three days ago, the number of boats being sixty. This is rumor.

H. C. KING,

Major, Commanding Post.

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, March 8, 1862.

General A. SIDNEY JOHNSTON,

Commanding, &c., Decatur, Ala.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, as suggested by you, Major General [E.] Kirby Smith, who has been assigned to the command of the troops in the District of East Tennessee, will communicate directly to the War Department, but that his district need not be separated from your department, as combined movements may perhaps become desirable. As Chattanooga is in East Tennessee, it necessarily belongs to Major-General Smith's district. But if you should desire to maintain control of that post, you can either separate it from the district of General Smith or leave it under his command, as you may deem best.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

JACKSON, March 8, 1862.

General POLK:

Hold your troops-infantry, artillery, and cavalry-ready to move at any moment, with five days' provisions and proper supply of ammunition.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

JACKSON, March 8, 1862.

General POLK:

I believe it would be well to establish your headquarters at once at Humboldt, for the present.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH ALABAMA, Tuscumbia, March 8, 1862.

Brigadier General DANIEL RUGGLES,

Commanding C. S. Troops, Corinth, Miss.:

GENERAL: I have received your communication of this date, in which you direct me to state-

Whether a regiment of infantry and one wing of Clanton's cavalry will be sufficient force to enable you to meet all reasonable requirements on the Columbia (Tennessee) railroad, connected with the interests of the service.

In answering this question you will permit me to say that my posi-