War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0277 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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hope to be able here and there to gather 4,000 or 5,000 troops and meet him; but if there are any troops that could be sent forward to this place I shall be glad, and there should be no delay. Independent of the present emergency, troops have been greatly needed between the Tennessee and Cumberland. We have not had enough troops to punish marauders or to encourage the Union sentiment. Cavalry has been much needed, since much of the enemy's cavalry has been sent to the north side of the Tennessee. I telegraph direct to you, as I fear the delay that might result from trying to reach General Buell, but I shall dispatch him also.

E. DUMONT,

Brigadier-General.

WASHINGTON, June 8, 1862.

General BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

If you will specify what number of arms you require for cavalry the Ordnance Department will be directed to supply them immediately. By order made to-day the Department of the Mississippi is extended over the whole of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee, and officers commanding in those States are directed to report to General Halleck for orders. Unless upon extraordinary emergency it is not within the scope of your power to call for troops from other States.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, June 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Corinth, Miss.:

We are changing one of the departmental lines, so as to give you all of Kentucky and Tennessee. In your movement upon Chattanooga I think it probable that you include some combination of the force near Cumberland Gap under General Morgan. Do you?

A. LINCOLN.

WASHINGTON, June 8, 1862-10 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Corinth:

Your dispatch of this date just received.* You may authorize General Curtis to raise whatever troops in your opinion are required for the service.

By order made to-day the whole of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee are placed in your command. There seems to be much alarm in the mind of General Dumont in regard to Nashville, and he has been calling through General Boyle, at Louisville, for troops from Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, seriously interfering with the contemplated disposition of the new recruits raising in those States. Can there be any occasion for this alarm?

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

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*Relating to affairs in Missouri and Arkansas.

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