War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0276 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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cut off 75 of Colonel Lester's scouts this morning near Readyville. Can you not send a regiment or battalion, to be forwarded to Nashville, or to replace such as I may send? I have none to spare. If the Ohio is to be protected, let the line of defense be as far as far south as possible.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

I can now spare a fine regiment at Chicago which your ordered to General Halleck. Please advise me immediately what you prefer me to do.

RICHARD YATES,

Governor.

LOUISVILLE, KY., June 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

General Dumont telegraphed last night for re-enforcements. Says the enemy, in considerable force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, are on the west side of the mountains, and are marching on and intend to attack this place [Nashville]; that they cut off 75 of Colonel Wynkoop's [?] scouts near Readyville. He inquires if there are troops in Indiana and Ohio that could be brought forward. I telegraphed Governors Morton and Tod, and will send five companies to-day. I will order them to Bowling Green, within a few hours of Nashville by rail. I telegraphed General Buell at Booneville, Miss., on the subject. Will you direct the ordnance officer here to supply arms for cavalry on my order?

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN., June 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have pretty reliable intelligence that a considerable body of the enemy's infantry, cavalry, and artillery are on this side of the mountains, and meditate an attack on Murfreesborough and Nashville. I am informed by Colonel Lester, who is in command of a very small force at Murfreesborough-say 300 infantry, 100 cavalry, and two pieces of artillery-that his mounted pickets were cut off this morning at Readyville, and that out of 75 but 7 have come in. This was probably done by the enemy's advance guard. I am very weak at this place-not to exceed 1,200 effective men, 100 cavalry, and a battery, just organized; the men as yet wholly undrilled and incapable of using the guns effectively. Should the enemy prove pretty strong I fear that neither General Mitchel nor General Buell can afford timely aid, owing to the distance they must march before reaching railroad. I would think from what information I have that the enemy is quite strong in cavalry, and that of cavalry and infantry his strength may be 10,000. It is said that Governor Harris is at the head of these troops, and that the hope is that an uprising of the people may take place. I think the hope of this result is really the object of the expedition. I am not all frightened. Think it likely that the enemy may not be so strong, and at all events