War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0258 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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Not one of the soldiers on board hesitated to share the fate of the steamer.

CHAS. ELLET, JR.,

Colonel, Commanding, &c.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Booneville, June 5, 1862-5 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have carefully examined the ground, and shall at daylight to-morrow morning assault by way of Blackland, moving upon that place in three columns-from Booneville, from Rienzi, and from a point between.

It will require the best part of the day to dispose the troops for that purpose and repair the roads so as to make them practicable in our front.

The enemy's right is very strong and inaccessible.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

BOONEVILLE, June 5, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I shall attack the enemy to-morrow by way of Blackland, marching on that point in three columns, as follows: Two divisions from Booneville; two divisions, under T. W. Sherman, from Rienzi; two divisions, under Hamilton, from a point half way between Booneville to Rienzi. There will probably be a sharp engagement on Twenty Mile Creek and beyond, in direction of Baldwyn. The enemy is in strong force behind the creek, his right effectually covered by jungle and swamp. I have carefully examined the whole ground and shall assault with my whole force. I think, to provide for every contingency, at least two divisions should be advanced to Rienzi to-morrow early, from Buell or Sherman. I do not know that they will be needed, but it will be safe to have them there.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General.

BOONEVILLE, June 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I think, to make our operations perfectly secure to-morrow, it will be well to advance T. W. Sherman to-day as far as possible, say to Kossuth, with orders to march toward Blackland at daylight to-morrow morning by the direct road from Kossuth.

It is impossible to ascertain the force of the enemy beyond Twenty Mile Creek; it was large yesterday, Bragg commanding the left wing. If my operations are successful, I shall at an early hour to-morrow fall upon him with my whole force. If not surprised, he will be so nearly so as to secure us great advantage. I suggest in Sherman's movement that every precaution may be taken.

Your dispatch of this date just received. If you prefer that my attack be not made, telegraph me immediately, as I am preparing for it.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General.